Effects of postnatal manipulation on nociception and morphine sensitivity in adult mice

Francesca R. D'Amato, Elio Mazzacane, Francesca Capone, Flaminia Pavone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The long-term effects of postnatal manipulation on nociception were studied in NMRI albino male mice. During the first two weeks of life, pups were removed from their cage and deprived of maternal/nest odour for 15 min/day. To evaluate pain sensitivity, adult mice exposed to this postnatal manipulation (CB group) were tail flick and formalin tested for acute and tonic pain, respectively. CB mice showed a reduced pain sensitivity both in tail-flick and in formalin tests in comparison with control animals. Moreover, responsiveness to morphine (MO 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in young (35 days old) and adult (90 days old) postnatally manipulated animals was evaluated with the tail-flick test: a decrease of the antinociceptive effects induced by morphine both in young and adult males was observed in postnatally manipulated animals. Morphine induced significant analgesic effects in control mice at doses lower than those affecting nociceptive thresholds both in young and adult CB mice. In addition, young animals showed a higher sensitivity to morphine than adults, independently of postnatal manipulation. The long-term effects of postnatal manipulation on nociception are discussed in terms of involvement of the opioid system and of the characteristics of pup manipulation. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-20
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Brain Research
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 20 1999

Keywords

  • Development
  • Morphine
  • Mouse
  • Pain sensitivity
  • Postnatal manipulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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