Effects of sustained, voluntary attention on amplitude and latency of steady-state visual evoked potential: A costs and benefits analysis

F. Di Russo, D. Spinelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Steady-state visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded to study the mechanisms that underlie visual attention. Methods: VEPs were recorded from 1 cycle/degree sinusoidal grating contrast reversed at various temporal frequencies (6-10 Hz). This was displayed in one hemifield. A letter search display was flashed at a random rate in the other hemifield. The subject performed a demanding task on the recording stimulus (attended condition) or on the opposite side stimulus (unattended condition). Alternatively, he/she passively fixated on the fixation point (passive condition). Results: Relative to the passive condition, attended stimuli elicited enhanced-amplitude and shortened-latency VEP (benefits). Costs (i.e. responses to passive vs. unattended stimuli) were more marked for latency. Conclusions: VEP latency may be the key of a priority-based attention mechanism acting at an early level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1771-1777
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume113
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2002

Keywords

  • Steady-state visual evoked potential
  • Temporal frequency
  • Visual attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)

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