Effects of thoraco-pelvic supports during prone position in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: A physiological study

Davide Chiumello, Massimo Cressoni, Milena Racagni, Laura Landi, Gianluigi Li Bassi, Federico Polli, Eleonora Carlesso, Luciano Gattinoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: This study sought to assess whether the use of thoraco-pelvic supports during prone positioning in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) improves, deteriorates or leaves unmodified gas exchange, hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics. Methods: We studied 11 patients with ALI/ARDS, sedated and paralyzed, mechanically ventilated in volume control ventilation. Prone positioning with or without thoraco-pelvic supports was applied in a random sequence and maintained for a 1-hour period without changing the ventilation setting. In four healthy subjects the pressures between the body and the contact surface were measured with and without thoraco-pelvic supports. Oxygenation variables (arterial and central venous), physiologic dead space, end-expiratory lung volume (helium dilution technique) and respiratory mechanics (partitioned between lung and chest wall) were measured after 60 minutes in each condition. Results: With thoraco-pelvic supports, the contact pressures almost doubled in comparison with those measured without supports (19.1 ± 15.2 versus 10.8 ± 7.0 cmH2O, p ≤ 0.05; means ± SD). The oxygenation-related variables were not different in the prone position, with or without thoraco-pelvic supports; neither were the CO2-related variables. The lung volumes were similar in the prone position with and without thoraco-pelvic supports. The use of thoraco-pelvic supports, however, did lead to a significant decrease in chest wall compliance from 158.1 ± 77.8 to 102.5 ± 38.0 ml/cmH2O and a significantly increased pleural pressure from 4.3 ± 1.9 to 6.1 ± 1.8 cmH2O, in comparison with the prone position without supports. Moreover, when thoraco-pelvic supports were added, heart rate increased significantly from 82.1 ± 17.9 to 86.7 ± 16.7 beats/minute and stroke volume index decreased significantly from 37.8 ± 6.8 to 34.9 ± 5.4 ml/ m2. The increase in pleural pressure change was associated with a significant increase in heart rate (p = 0.0003) and decrease in stroke volume index (p = 0.0241). Conclusion: The application of thoraco-pelvic supports decreases chest wall compliance, increases pleural pressure and slightly deteriorates hemodynamics without any advantage in gas exchange. Consequently, we stopped their use in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberR87
JournalCritical Care
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 8 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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