Efficacy and economic value of adjuvant imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Piotr Rutkowski, Alessandro Gronchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. This article presents the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of theuseof adjuvant imatinib mesylate for treating patients with localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and discusses the impact of prolonged treatment with adjuvant imatinib on health care costs. Methods.Asystematic review of the medical literaturewasconducted to explore recently reported clinical trials demonstrating the clinical benefit of adjuvant imatinib in GISTs, along with analyses discussing the economic impact of adjuvant imatinib. Results. Two phase III trials have demonstrated a significant clinical benefit of adjuvant imatinib treatment in GIST patients at risk of recurrence after tumor resection. Guidelines now suggest adjuvant treatment for at least 3 years in patients at high risk of recurrence. Despite this clinical effectiveness, prolonged use of adjuvant imatinib can lead to an increase in the risk for adverse eventsandto increased costs for both patients and health care systems. However, the increased cost is partially offset by cost reductions associated with delayed or avoided GIST recurrences. Three years of adjuvant treatment in high-risk patients was concluded to be cost-effective. Therefore, the careful selection of patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment can lead to improved clinical outcomes and significant cost savings. Conclusion. Although introducing adjuvant imatinib has an economic impact on health plans, this effect seems to be limited. Several analyses have demonstrated that adjuvant imatinib ismorecost-effective for treating localized primary GISTs than surgery alone. In addition, 3 years of adjuvant imatinib is more cost-effective than 1 year of adjuvant therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689-696
Number of pages8
JournalThe oncologist
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Imatinib Mesylate
Cost Savings
Health Care Costs
Patient Selection
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Patient Care
Clinical Trials
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Keywords

  • Adjuvant
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Economics
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumor
  • Imatinib

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Efficacy and economic value of adjuvant imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumors. / Rutkowski, Piotr; Gronchi, Alessandro.

In: The oncologist, Vol. 18, No. 6, 2013, p. 689-696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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