Efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage in patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococci

Onofrio A. Catalano, Peter F. Hahn, David C. Hooper, Peter R. Mueller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We reviewed a 4-year experience draining fluid collections infected with vancomycin-resistant enterococci to determine the outcome of percutaneous intervention in patients with this highly resistant and increasingly common organism. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Charts of patients from whom vancomycin-resistant enterococci had been isolated during percutaneous drainage were reviewed to determine patient response to drainage, catheter management, and outcome of treatment. RESULTS. Twenty-one patients underwent percutaneous drainage of 28 fluid collections from which vancomycin-resistant enterococci were isolated, including 16 intraabdominal abscesses, seven biliary or urinary obstructions, and five empyemas. The drainage of 27 (96%) of 28 collections were technically successful. In seven patients, drainage provided the first isolation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from the patient. Five patients also had blood cultures with positive findings for vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and 14 collections were coinfected with other bacteria or with fungi. Twenty collections (71%) or obstructions were successfully treated with percutaneous drainage. Drainage was unsuccessful in treating eight collections in seven patients. CONCLUSION. Despite high-level antibiotic resistance, fluid collections infected with vancomycin-resistant enterococci can be successfully drained percutaneously, resulting in a favorable likelihood of recovery for patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-536
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume175
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2000

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Abscess
Drainage
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Empyema
Microbial Drug Resistance
Fungi
Catheters
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Catalano, O. A., Hahn, P. F., Hooper, D. C., & Mueller, P. R. (2000). Efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage in patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. American Journal of Roentgenology, 175(2), 533-536.

Efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage in patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. / Catalano, Onofrio A.; Hahn, Peter F.; Hooper, David C.; Mueller, Peter R.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 175, No. 2, 08.2000, p. 533-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Catalano, OA, Hahn, PF, Hooper, DC & Mueller, PR 2000, 'Efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage in patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococci', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 175, no. 2, pp. 533-536.
Catalano, Onofrio A. ; Hahn, Peter F. ; Hooper, David C. ; Mueller, Peter R. / Efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage in patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2000 ; Vol. 175, No. 2. pp. 533-536.
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