Electropherotypes, subgroups and serotypes of human rotavirus strains causing gastroenteritis in infants and young children in Palermo, Italy, from 1985 to 1989

S. Arista, L. Giovannelli, D. Pistoia, A. Cascio, M. Parea, G. Gerna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During 1985-1989, an epidemiological survey was conducted in Palermo, Sicily (Southern Italy) on group A human rotavirus (HRV) strains which cause gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Two hundred and thirty eight HRV strains were characterized for subgroup and serotype using monoclonal-antibody-based ELISA systems, and for electropherotype using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Subgroup II strains were largely predominant, constituting 218 238 of the positive stool samples (91.6 %). Among the serotypes, 192 238 strains (80.7 %) were serotype 1 and 16 strains (6.7 %) were serotype 4; serotype 2 circulated intermittentlye and serotype 3 was nearly absent (only one subgroup I strain was detected). Two electropherotypes, bbba and cbba, accounted for the largest proportion of the 345 HRV strains examined, 74 (21.4 %) and 222 (64.3 %) strains, respectively. Unexpected combinations of subgroup, serotype and electropherotype were detected in 5 subgroup I strains, of which 4 possessed a "long" RNA pattern (1 serotype 3 and 3 serotype 4 strains) and one a "short" RNA pattern (a serotype 4 strain). In addition, 4 group C HRV strains (atypical HRV or pararotaviruses) were detected on the basis of electropherotype. These findings emphasize the need for continuous surveillance of HRV infections in different geographic areas of the world in order to detect the.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-448
Number of pages14
JournalResearch in Virology
Volume141
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

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