Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view

Gabriella Pravettoni, Whitney R. Yoder, Silvia Riva, Ketti Mazzocco, Paola Arnaboldi, Viviana Galimberti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis.Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-85
Number of pages4
JournalBreast
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • Breast cancer diagnosis
  • Cognitive psychology
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ
  • Heuristics
  • Lobular carcinoma in situ
  • Psychological aspects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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