Emerging and re-emerging virus infections in neonates and young pediatric patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The epidemiology of virus infections has changed dramatically in Europe in recent years due to ecologic, anthropologic and biologic factors such as: i) climate modifications, ii) global exchange of goods and international travel, iii) increased immigration flux from Africa, South America, the Middle East and Asia, iv) reduction of cultivated areas, and v) emergence and re-emergence of human viruses from zoonotic reservoirs. In addition, recent technical advancements have allowed the identification of previously unrecognized autochthonous viral species. Thus, at present, the technical and cultural challenge is to recognize infections caused by viruses not normally circulating in our geographical region (both as imported cases or potential local outbreaks), sustained by recently discovered autochthonous viruses or due to recognized viruses which are no longer widespread in Western Europe due to past vaccination campaigns.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEarly Human Development
Volume90
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Virus Diseases
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Viruses
Immunization Programs
Middle East
Far East
South America
Emigration and Immigration
Zoonoses
Biological Factors
Climate
Disease Outbreaks
Epidemiology

Keywords

  • Emerging viruses
  • Enterovirus
  • Epidemiology
  • Measles
  • Newborn
  • Parechovirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Emerging and re-emerging virus infections in neonates and young pediatric patients",
abstract = "The epidemiology of virus infections has changed dramatically in Europe in recent years due to ecologic, anthropologic and biologic factors such as: i) climate modifications, ii) global exchange of goods and international travel, iii) increased immigration flux from Africa, South America, the Middle East and Asia, iv) reduction of cultivated areas, and v) emergence and re-emergence of human viruses from zoonotic reservoirs. In addition, recent technical advancements have allowed the identification of previously unrecognized autochthonous viral species. Thus, at present, the technical and cultural challenge is to recognize infections caused by viruses not normally circulating in our geographical region (both as imported cases or potential local outbreaks), sustained by recently discovered autochthonous viruses or due to recognized viruses which are no longer widespread in Western Europe due to past vaccination campaigns.",
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author = "Fausto Baldanti and Antonio Piralla and Giulia Campanini and Francesca Rovida and Chryssoula Tzialla and Mauro Stronati",
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AU - Baldanti, Fausto

AU - Piralla, Antonio

AU - Campanini, Giulia

AU - Rovida, Francesca

AU - Tzialla, Chryssoula

AU - Stronati, Mauro

PY - 2014

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N2 - The epidemiology of virus infections has changed dramatically in Europe in recent years due to ecologic, anthropologic and biologic factors such as: i) climate modifications, ii) global exchange of goods and international travel, iii) increased immigration flux from Africa, South America, the Middle East and Asia, iv) reduction of cultivated areas, and v) emergence and re-emergence of human viruses from zoonotic reservoirs. In addition, recent technical advancements have allowed the identification of previously unrecognized autochthonous viral species. Thus, at present, the technical and cultural challenge is to recognize infections caused by viruses not normally circulating in our geographical region (both as imported cases or potential local outbreaks), sustained by recently discovered autochthonous viruses or due to recognized viruses which are no longer widespread in Western Europe due to past vaccination campaigns.

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KW - Epidemiology

KW - Measles

KW - Newborn

KW - Parechovirus

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