Enhancement of radial maze performances in CD1 mice after prenatal exposure to oxiracetam: Possible role of sustained investigative responses developed during ontogeny

Martine Ammassari-Teule, Francesca R. D'Amato, Mario Sansone, Alberto Oliverio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A longitudinal study aimed at analyzing the behavioral effects of prenatal exposure to the nootropic compound oxiracetam was carried out in CD1 mice. Two groups of females were injected either with oxiracetam or saline from the beginning of pregnancy until parturition. Examination of pups from birth until the first month of age revealed no influence of the treatment on litter size, body weights, sensory motor reflexes and motility. When placed in the open field at one month of age, mice born by mothers exposed to oxiracetam displayed more self grooming and spent less time in freezing than control mice. Prenatally treated mice were then found more interactive with their environment since the introduction of a novel object in the open field was followed by increased ambulation and higher sniffing object and rearing object scores. At three months of age, mice from both groups were tested in a radial six-arm maze task. Choice accuracy was significantly higher in prenatally treated mice which also tended to optimize their exploratory sequences by frequently running the maze in a clock-wise fashion. These results suggest that the better learning performances observed in the experimental group could be viewed as a consequence of an enhanced cognitive development based upon the higher rate of interactions with the environment shown by prenatally treated mice during ontogeny.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-285
Number of pages5
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988

Keywords

  • Novelty
  • Open field
  • Oxiracetam
  • Prenatal exposure
  • Radial maze performance
  • Sensory motor development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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