Epidemiology and clinical relevance of microbial resistance determinants versus anti-Gram-positive agents

Gian Maria Rossolini, Elisabetta Mantengoli, Francesca Montagnani, Simona Pollini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gram-positive pathogens are a major cause of community-acquired and hospital-acquired infections, and exhibit a remarkable ability to develop antibiotic resistance. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) and multidrug-resistant pneumococci are currently the major resistance challenges among Gram-positives, due to their global dissemination and overall clinical impact. The mechanisms of evolution of these resistance phenotypes are based on a diverse array of mutational events and gene transfer phenomena carried out by several types of mobile genetic elements, followed by the dissemination of successful resistant clones. Resistance to glycopeptides in staphylococci remains uncommon, likely due to fitness issues. Resistance to the new anti-Gram-positive agents (linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline) overall remains very rare. However, a transferable resistance mechanism to linezolid, mediated by ribosomal target modification by the Cfr protein, has recently emerged among S. aureus, being a matter of raising concern. Linezolid resistance among enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci is also increasingly reported. Moreover, a role for antibiotic resistance has been advocated in the recent increase of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) associated with the emergence of hypervirulent strains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)582-588
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Microbiology
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

Linezolid
Epidemiology
Glycopeptides
Enterococcus
Microbial Drug Resistance
Staphylococcus
Daptomycin
Interspersed Repetitive Sequences
Clostridium Infections
Clostridium difficile
Coagulase
Community Hospital
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Cross Infection
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Staphylococcus aureus
Clone Cells
Phenotype
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Epidemiology and clinical relevance of microbial resistance determinants versus anti-Gram-positive agents. / Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mantengoli, Elisabetta; Montagnani, Francesca; Pollini, Simona.

In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 13, No. 5, 10.2010, p. 582-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossolini, Gian Maria ; Mantengoli, Elisabetta ; Montagnani, Francesca ; Pollini, Simona. / Epidemiology and clinical relevance of microbial resistance determinants versus anti-Gram-positive agents. In: Current Opinion in Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 582-588.
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