Epidemiology and genetic characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infections in long-term care facilities

Marco Tinelli, Maria Adriana Cataldo, Elisabetta Mantengoli, Chiara Cadeddu, Ettore Cunietti, Francesco Luzzaro, Gian Maria Rossolini, Evelina Tacconelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To assess risk factors for acquiring extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (ESBL+ GN) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods: A prospective case-case-control study was carried out. In the first study, cases were defined as patients harbouring ESBL+ GN, while, in the second study, cases were defined as patients harbouring ESBL-negative (ESBL-) GN. Controls were selected by simple random sampling from patients without GN infection. ESBL determinants were characterized by hybridization, and confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Results: The study involved 297 LTCF patients (99 with ESBL+ GN UTI, 99 with ESBL- GN UTI and 99 without GN infection). ESBL+ GN UTIs were due to Escherichia coli (64%), Proteus mirabilis (25%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (11%). The CTX-M-type enzymes were the most prevalent (73% of isolates), whereas TEM- and SHV-type ESBLs and AmpC-type enzymes were less prevalent (10%, 2% and 15% of isolates, respectively). Patients with ESBL+ GN UTI were more likely to have a permanent urinary catheter (OR 15, 95% CI 6.9-30.5) and to have received antimicrobial therapy in the previous 30 days (OR 4, 95% CI 1.2-10.9). After adjusting for type, dosage and duration of antibiotic, exposure to ≥7 days of quinolones and third-generation cephalosporins was associated with the highest risk of ESBL+ GN UTI development (OR 7, 95% CI 1.2-40). Independent risk factors for acquiring ESBL-GN UTIs were previous surgical procedures (OR 2, 95% CI 1.1-4) and the presence of a urinary catheter (OR 8, 95% CI 4-16). No specific antibiotics remained a significant risk for ESBL- GN UTI after adjusting for demographic and clinical risk factors. Conclusions: Exposure to ≥7 days of quinolones and third-generation cephalosporins significantly increases the risk of ESBL+ GN UTI. Interventions aimed at improving compliance with antimicrobial stewardship principles should be further developed and implemented in LTCFs.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberdks300
Pages (from-to)2982-2987
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume67
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • Multidrug-resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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