Epigenetic control of skeletal muscle regeneration: Integrating genetic determinants and environmental changes

Lorenzo Giordani, Pier Lorenzo Puri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During embryonic development, pluripotent cells are genetically committed to specific lineages by the expression of cell-type-specific transcriptional activators that direct the formation of specialized tissues and organs in response to developmental cues. Chromatin-modifying proteins are emerging as essential components of the epigenetic machinery, which establishes the nuclear landscape that ultimately determines the final identity and functional specialization of adult cells. Recent evidence has revealed that discrete populations of adult cells can retain the ability to adopt alternative cell fates in response to environmental cues. These cells include conventional adult stem cells and a still poorly defined collection of cell types endowed with facultative phenotype and functional plasticity. Under physiological conditions or adaptive states, these cells cooperate to support tissue and organ homeostasis, and to promote growth or compensatory regeneration. However, during chronic diseases and aging these cells can adopt a pathological phenotype and mediate maladaptive responses, such as the formation of fibrotic scars and fat deposition that progressively replaces structural and functional units of tissues and organs. The molecular determinants of these phenotypic transitions are only emerging from recent studies that reveal how dynamic chromatin states can generate flexible epigenetic landscapes, which confer on cells the ability to retain partial pluripotency and adapt to environmental changes. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the role of the epigenetic machinery as a 'filter' between genetic commitment and environmental signals in cell types that can alternatively promote skeletal muscle regeneration or fibro-adipogenic degeneration. Recent evidence has revealed that discrete populations of adult cells can retain the ability to adopt alternative cell fates in response to environmental cues. The molecular determinants of these transitions reveal how dynamic chromatin states can generate flexible epigenetic landscapes that confer the ability to retain partial pluripotency and adapt to environmental changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4014-4025
Number of pages12
JournalFEBS Journal
Volume280
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Epigenomics
Chromatin
Muscle
Regeneration
Skeletal Muscle
Tissue
Machinery
Aptitude
Stem cells
Plasticity
Aging of materials
Fats
Cells
Cues
Proteins
Phenotype
Adult Stem Cells
Cell Aging
Population
Embryonic Development

Keywords

  • chromatin
  • Duchenne dystrophy
  • epigenetics
  • fibro/adipogenic progenitors
  • muscle
  • muscle differentiation
  • muscle interstistial cells
  • muscle stem cells
  • regeneration
  • satellite cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Epigenetic control of skeletal muscle regeneration : Integrating genetic determinants and environmental changes. / Giordani, Lorenzo; Puri, Pier Lorenzo.

In: FEBS Journal, Vol. 280, No. 17, 09.2013, p. 4014-4025.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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