(Epi)genotype-phenotype correlations in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: A paradigm for genomic medicine

A. Mussa, S. Russo, L. Larizza, A. Riccio, G. B. Ferrero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is the commonest overgrowth cancer predisposition disorder and represents a model for human imprinting dysregulation and tumorigenesis. BWS features can variably combine and present a widely variable range of severity in the phenotypic expression. This wide spectrum is paralleled at molecular level by complex (epi)genetic defects on chromosome 11p15.5 leading to disrupted expression of imprinted genes controlling growth and cellular proliferation. In this review, we outline the spectrum of clinical manifestations of BWS analyzing their (epi)genotype-phenotype correlations. The differences observed in the phenotypic profiles of BWS molecular subtypes allow a composite view of this syndrome with implications on clinical care, diagnosis, follow-up, and management, and provide directions for future disease monitoring.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Genetics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome
Genetic Association Studies
Medicine
Aftercare
Carcinogenesis
Chromosomes
Cell Proliferation
Gene Expression
Growth
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • (epi)genotype
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann
  • Cancer predisposition
  • Overgrowth
  • Phenotype correlations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

(Epi)genotype-phenotype correlations in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome : A paradigm for genomic medicine. / Mussa, A.; Russo, S.; Larizza, L.; Riccio, A.; Ferrero, G. B.

In: Clinical Genetics, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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