Erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

424 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Methods: 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease were assessed using a semi-structured interview investigating their medical and sexual histories, the International Index of Erectile Function and other instruments. Results: Patient mean age was 62.5 ± 8 years (range 33-86 years). Mean duration of symptoms or signs of myocardial ischaemia prior to enrolment in the study was 49 months (range 1-200). Coronary angiography showed 1-, 2- and 3-vessel disease in 98 (32.6%), 88 (29.3%) and 114 (38%) patients, respectively. The prevalence of ED among all patients was 49% (147/300). Erectile dysfunction was scored as mild, mild to moderate, moderate and severe in 21 (14%), 31 (21%), 20 (14%), and 75 (51%) of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between patients with ED (n = 147) or without ED (n = 153) as far as clinical and angiographic characteristics were concerned. In the 147 patients with co-existing ED and CAD, ED symptoms were reported as having become clinically evident prior to CAD symptoms by 99/147 (67%) patients. The mean time interval between the onset of ED and CAD was 38.8 months (range 1-168). There was no significant difference in terms of risk factor distribution and clinical and angiographic characteristics between patients with the onset of ED before vs. after CAD diagnosis. Interestingly, all patients with type I diabetes and ED actually developed sexual dysfunction before CAD onset (p <0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests that a significant proportion of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease have erectile dysfunction and that this latter condition may become evident prior to angina symptoms in almost 70% of cases. Future studies including a control group of patients with coronary artery disease and normal erectile function are required in order to verify whether erectile dysfunction may be considered a real predictor of ischemic heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-365
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Urology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2003

Fingerprint

Acute Pain
Erectile Dysfunction
Chest Pain
Coronary Artery Disease
Myocardial Ischemia
Hospital Distribution Systems
Coronary Angiography
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Signs and Symptoms

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Impotence
  • Peripheral vascular disease
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

@article{6747747a836f49118a591540982f79d2,
title = "Erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease",
abstract = "Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Methods: 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease were assessed using a semi-structured interview investigating their medical and sexual histories, the International Index of Erectile Function and other instruments. Results: Patient mean age was 62.5 ± 8 years (range 33-86 years). Mean duration of symptoms or signs of myocardial ischaemia prior to enrolment in the study was 49 months (range 1-200). Coronary angiography showed 1-, 2- and 3-vessel disease in 98 (32.6{\%}), 88 (29.3{\%}) and 114 (38{\%}) patients, respectively. The prevalence of ED among all patients was 49{\%} (147/300). Erectile dysfunction was scored as mild, mild to moderate, moderate and severe in 21 (14{\%}), 31 (21{\%}), 20 (14{\%}), and 75 (51{\%}) of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between patients with ED (n = 147) or without ED (n = 153) as far as clinical and angiographic characteristics were concerned. In the 147 patients with co-existing ED and CAD, ED symptoms were reported as having become clinically evident prior to CAD symptoms by 99/147 (67{\%}) patients. The mean time interval between the onset of ED and CAD was 38.8 months (range 1-168). There was no significant difference in terms of risk factor distribution and clinical and angiographic characteristics between patients with the onset of ED before vs. after CAD diagnosis. Interestingly, all patients with type I diabetes and ED actually developed sexual dysfunction before CAD onset (p <0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests that a significant proportion of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease have erectile dysfunction and that this latter condition may become evident prior to angina symptoms in almost 70{\%} of cases. Future studies including a control group of patients with coronary artery disease and normal erectile function are required in order to verify whether erectile dysfunction may be considered a real predictor of ischemic heart disease.",
keywords = "Coronary artery disease, Erectile dysfunction, Impotence, Peripheral vascular disease, Prevalence",
author = "Francesco Montorsi and Alberto Briganti and Andrea Salonia and Patrizio Rigatti and Alberto Margonato and Andrea Macchi and Stefano Galli and Ravagnani, {Paolo M.} and Piero Montorsi and Heaton, {Jeremy P W}",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0302-2838(03)00305-1",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "360--365",
journal = "European Urology",
issn = "0302-2838",
publisher = "Elsevier B.V.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease

AU - Montorsi, Francesco

AU - Briganti, Alberto

AU - Salonia, Andrea

AU - Rigatti, Patrizio

AU - Margonato, Alberto

AU - Macchi, Andrea

AU - Galli, Stefano

AU - Ravagnani, Paolo M.

AU - Montorsi, Piero

AU - Heaton, Jeremy P W

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Methods: 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease were assessed using a semi-structured interview investigating their medical and sexual histories, the International Index of Erectile Function and other instruments. Results: Patient mean age was 62.5 ± 8 years (range 33-86 years). Mean duration of symptoms or signs of myocardial ischaemia prior to enrolment in the study was 49 months (range 1-200). Coronary angiography showed 1-, 2- and 3-vessel disease in 98 (32.6%), 88 (29.3%) and 114 (38%) patients, respectively. The prevalence of ED among all patients was 49% (147/300). Erectile dysfunction was scored as mild, mild to moderate, moderate and severe in 21 (14%), 31 (21%), 20 (14%), and 75 (51%) of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between patients with ED (n = 147) or without ED (n = 153) as far as clinical and angiographic characteristics were concerned. In the 147 patients with co-existing ED and CAD, ED symptoms were reported as having become clinically evident prior to CAD symptoms by 99/147 (67%) patients. The mean time interval between the onset of ED and CAD was 38.8 months (range 1-168). There was no significant difference in terms of risk factor distribution and clinical and angiographic characteristics between patients with the onset of ED before vs. after CAD diagnosis. Interestingly, all patients with type I diabetes and ED actually developed sexual dysfunction before CAD onset (p <0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests that a significant proportion of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease have erectile dysfunction and that this latter condition may become evident prior to angina symptoms in almost 70% of cases. Future studies including a control group of patients with coronary artery disease and normal erectile function are required in order to verify whether erectile dysfunction may be considered a real predictor of ischemic heart disease.

AB - Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess erectile dysfunction prevalence, time of onset and association with risk factors in patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Methods: 300 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and angiographically documented coronary artery disease were assessed using a semi-structured interview investigating their medical and sexual histories, the International Index of Erectile Function and other instruments. Results: Patient mean age was 62.5 ± 8 years (range 33-86 years). Mean duration of symptoms or signs of myocardial ischaemia prior to enrolment in the study was 49 months (range 1-200). Coronary angiography showed 1-, 2- and 3-vessel disease in 98 (32.6%), 88 (29.3%) and 114 (38%) patients, respectively. The prevalence of ED among all patients was 49% (147/300). Erectile dysfunction was scored as mild, mild to moderate, moderate and severe in 21 (14%), 31 (21%), 20 (14%), and 75 (51%) of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between patients with ED (n = 147) or without ED (n = 153) as far as clinical and angiographic characteristics were concerned. In the 147 patients with co-existing ED and CAD, ED symptoms were reported as having become clinically evident prior to CAD symptoms by 99/147 (67%) patients. The mean time interval between the onset of ED and CAD was 38.8 months (range 1-168). There was no significant difference in terms of risk factor distribution and clinical and angiographic characteristics between patients with the onset of ED before vs. after CAD diagnosis. Interestingly, all patients with type I diabetes and ED actually developed sexual dysfunction before CAD onset (p <0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests that a significant proportion of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease have erectile dysfunction and that this latter condition may become evident prior to angina symptoms in almost 70% of cases. Future studies including a control group of patients with coronary artery disease and normal erectile function are required in order to verify whether erectile dysfunction may be considered a real predictor of ischemic heart disease.

KW - Coronary artery disease

KW - Erectile dysfunction

KW - Impotence

KW - Peripheral vascular disease

KW - Prevalence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10744225276&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10744225276&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0302-2838(03)00305-1

DO - 10.1016/S0302-2838(03)00305-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 12932937

AN - SCOPUS:10744225276

VL - 44

SP - 360

EP - 365

JO - European Urology

JF - European Urology

SN - 0302-2838

IS - 3

ER -