Estimation of dead space fraction can be simplified in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

Davide Chiumello, Elisabetta Gallazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema responsible for a significant impairment of gas exchange. The pulmonary dead space increase, which is due primarily to an alteration in pulmonary blood flow distribution, is largely responsible for carbon dioxide retention. Previous studies, computing the pulmonary dead space by measuring the expired carbon dioxide and the Enghoff equation, found that the dead space fraction was significantly higher in the non-survivors; it was even an independent risk of death. The computation of the dead space not by measuring the expired carbon dioxide but by applying a rearranged alveolar gas equation that takes into account only the weight, age, height, and temperature of the patient could lead to widespread clinical diffusion of this measurement at the bedside.

Original languageEnglish
Article number195
JournalCritical Care
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 6 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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