Evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of orthodontic bonding adhesives upon human gingival papillae through immunohistochemical expression of p53, p63 and p16

Francesca Angiero, Giampietro Farronato, Enrico Dessy, Sarah Magistro, Rossella Seramondi, Davide Farronato, Stefano Benedicenti, Stefano Tetè

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Numerous in vitro studies have shown that composite materials, commonly used for restorations in conservative dentistry, and in orthodontics to anchor brackets to the tooth enamel, have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The study determined expression of p53, p63 and p16, biomarkers useful for predicting potential genotoxicity. Patients and Methods: p53, p63 and p16 expression was determined immunohistochemically in the gingival papillae of 99 patients (69 banded orthodontically for at least one year, brackets bonded to teeth with filled flowable composite resin, 30 without orthodontic banding as controls). The papillae samples were removed surgically and examined to evaluate morphological and biological alterations. Results: In no case were morphological alterations visible by microscopy out of the 69 banded patients; four (5.80%>) were positive for p53 and two for p63 expression in the basal and suprabasal layers (2.90%). One patient was positive for p16 (1.45%). No control case was positive for any of the biomarkers (0.00% ). Conclusion: The significance of p53, p63 and p16 positivity, and whether these proteins may serve as biomarkers to predict the risk of developing oral lesions (dysplasia, oral cancer) is still unclear. Although details of the mechanisms leading to cell death, genotoxicity and cell-cycle delay are not fully understood, resin monomers may alter cell function in the oral cavity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3983-3987
Number of pages5
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume29
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

Fingerprint

Dental Cements
Biomarkers
Orthodontics
Tooth
Composite Resins
Mouth Neoplasms
Dental Enamel
Dentistry
Mouth
Microscopy
Cell Cycle
Cell Death
Proteins

Keywords

  • Gingival papillae
  • Oral cavity
  • p16
  • p53
  • p63

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of orthodontic bonding adhesives upon human gingival papillae through immunohistochemical expression of p53, p63 and p16. / Angiero, Francesca; Farronato, Giampietro; Dessy, Enrico; Magistro, Sarah; Seramondi, Rossella; Farronato, Davide; Benedicenti, Stefano; Tetè, Stefano.

In: Anticancer Research, Vol. 29, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 3983-3987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Angiero, Francesca ; Farronato, Giampietro ; Dessy, Enrico ; Magistro, Sarah ; Seramondi, Rossella ; Farronato, Davide ; Benedicenti, Stefano ; Tetè, Stefano. / Evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of orthodontic bonding adhesives upon human gingival papillae through immunohistochemical expression of p53, p63 and p16. In: Anticancer Research. 2009 ; Vol. 29, No. 10. pp. 3983-3987.
@article{f75822796bd0443b8a6423afbd7dc284,
title = "Evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of orthodontic bonding adhesives upon human gingival papillae through immunohistochemical expression of p53, p63 and p16",
abstract = "Background: Numerous in vitro studies have shown that composite materials, commonly used for restorations in conservative dentistry, and in orthodontics to anchor brackets to the tooth enamel, have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The study determined expression of p53, p63 and p16, biomarkers useful for predicting potential genotoxicity. Patients and Methods: p53, p63 and p16 expression was determined immunohistochemically in the gingival papillae of 99 patients (69 banded orthodontically for at least one year, brackets bonded to teeth with filled flowable composite resin, 30 without orthodontic banding as controls). The papillae samples were removed surgically and examined to evaluate morphological and biological alterations. Results: In no case were morphological alterations visible by microscopy out of the 69 banded patients; four (5.80{\%}>) were positive for p53 and two for p63 expression in the basal and suprabasal layers (2.90{\%}). One patient was positive for p16 (1.45{\%}). No control case was positive for any of the biomarkers (0.00{\%} ). Conclusion: The significance of p53, p63 and p16 positivity, and whether these proteins may serve as biomarkers to predict the risk of developing oral lesions (dysplasia, oral cancer) is still unclear. Although details of the mechanisms leading to cell death, genotoxicity and cell-cycle delay are not fully understood, resin monomers may alter cell function in the oral cavity.",
keywords = "Gingival papillae, Oral cavity, p16, p53, p63",
author = "Francesca Angiero and Giampietro Farronato and Enrico Dessy and Sarah Magistro and Rossella Seramondi and Davide Farronato and Stefano Benedicenti and Stefano Tet{\`e}",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "3983--3987",
journal = "Anticancer Research",
issn = "0250-7005",
publisher = "International Institute of Anticancer Research",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of orthodontic bonding adhesives upon human gingival papillae through immunohistochemical expression of p53, p63 and p16

AU - Angiero, Francesca

AU - Farronato, Giampietro

AU - Dessy, Enrico

AU - Magistro, Sarah

AU - Seramondi, Rossella

AU - Farronato, Davide

AU - Benedicenti, Stefano

AU - Tetè, Stefano

PY - 2009/10

Y1 - 2009/10

N2 - Background: Numerous in vitro studies have shown that composite materials, commonly used for restorations in conservative dentistry, and in orthodontics to anchor brackets to the tooth enamel, have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The study determined expression of p53, p63 and p16, biomarkers useful for predicting potential genotoxicity. Patients and Methods: p53, p63 and p16 expression was determined immunohistochemically in the gingival papillae of 99 patients (69 banded orthodontically for at least one year, brackets bonded to teeth with filled flowable composite resin, 30 without orthodontic banding as controls). The papillae samples were removed surgically and examined to evaluate morphological and biological alterations. Results: In no case were morphological alterations visible by microscopy out of the 69 banded patients; four (5.80%>) were positive for p53 and two for p63 expression in the basal and suprabasal layers (2.90%). One patient was positive for p16 (1.45%). No control case was positive for any of the biomarkers (0.00% ). Conclusion: The significance of p53, p63 and p16 positivity, and whether these proteins may serve as biomarkers to predict the risk of developing oral lesions (dysplasia, oral cancer) is still unclear. Although details of the mechanisms leading to cell death, genotoxicity and cell-cycle delay are not fully understood, resin monomers may alter cell function in the oral cavity.

AB - Background: Numerous in vitro studies have shown that composite materials, commonly used for restorations in conservative dentistry, and in orthodontics to anchor brackets to the tooth enamel, have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The study determined expression of p53, p63 and p16, biomarkers useful for predicting potential genotoxicity. Patients and Methods: p53, p63 and p16 expression was determined immunohistochemically in the gingival papillae of 99 patients (69 banded orthodontically for at least one year, brackets bonded to teeth with filled flowable composite resin, 30 without orthodontic banding as controls). The papillae samples were removed surgically and examined to evaluate morphological and biological alterations. Results: In no case were morphological alterations visible by microscopy out of the 69 banded patients; four (5.80%>) were positive for p53 and two for p63 expression in the basal and suprabasal layers (2.90%). One patient was positive for p16 (1.45%). No control case was positive for any of the biomarkers (0.00% ). Conclusion: The significance of p53, p63 and p16 positivity, and whether these proteins may serve as biomarkers to predict the risk of developing oral lesions (dysplasia, oral cancer) is still unclear. Although details of the mechanisms leading to cell death, genotoxicity and cell-cycle delay are not fully understood, resin monomers may alter cell function in the oral cavity.

KW - Gingival papillae

KW - Oral cavity

KW - p16

KW - p53

KW - p63

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=71949121855&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=71949121855&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 19846940

AN - SCOPUS:71949121855

VL - 29

SP - 3983

EP - 3987

JO - Anticancer Research

JF - Anticancer Research

SN - 0250-7005

IS - 10

ER -