Evening melatonin timing secretion in real life conditions in patients with Alzheimer disease of mild to moderate severity

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Circadian dysfunction is thought to take part in the pathogenesis of sleep disorders in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in AD pathophysiology itself.

OBJECTIVE: Our study aims to calculate dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) secretion in order to define the circadian phase in patients with AD at an early stage of the disease.

METHODS: Twenty-one patients (M/F: 11/10; mean age 74.1 ± 5.4 years; mean disease duration 3.4 ± 1.6 years) with a diagnosis of AD and 17 healthy controls (HC; M/F: 10/7; mean age 67.47 ± 3.8 years) were investigated for subjective nocturnal sleep quality and chronotype, for DLMO and quantitative aspects of the evening melatonin secretion by means of a 5-point in-home evening melatonin saliva test.

RESULTS: Subjective sleep quality score on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI) above 5 (p = 0.24), insomnia frequency as measured by Sleep Condition Indicator Questionnaire (p = 0.823) and the subjective chronotype according to Morning Evening Questionnaire (MEQ) scores distribution (p = 0.464) did not differ between AD and HC. However, DLMO occurred significantly later (55 min; p = 0.028), and melatonin secretion following DLMO was significantly decreased in AD patients compared to HC.

CONCLUSION: Initial evening secretion of melatonin proves to be delayed and mildly impaired in patients with a mild/moderate form of Alzheimer disease while patients' subjective sleep parameters and chronotype are reported to be similar to those of HC. These results indicate that subclinical altered patterns of melatonin secretion occur in subjects with AD at an early stage of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - May 31 2019

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Melatonin
Alzheimer Disease
Sleep
Light
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Saliva

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@article{6e6a9d833fc847749b5c424b45011f05,
title = "Evening melatonin timing secretion in real life conditions in patients with Alzheimer disease of mild to moderate severity",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Circadian dysfunction is thought to take part in the pathogenesis of sleep disorders in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in AD pathophysiology itself.OBJECTIVE: Our study aims to calculate dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) secretion in order to define the circadian phase in patients with AD at an early stage of the disease.METHODS: Twenty-one patients (M/F: 11/10; mean age 74.1 ± 5.4 years; mean disease duration 3.4 ± 1.6 years) with a diagnosis of AD and 17 healthy controls (HC; M/F: 10/7; mean age 67.47 ± 3.8 years) were investigated for subjective nocturnal sleep quality and chronotype, for DLMO and quantitative aspects of the evening melatonin secretion by means of a 5-point in-home evening melatonin saliva test.RESULTS: Subjective sleep quality score on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI) above 5 (p = 0.24), insomnia frequency as measured by Sleep Condition Indicator Questionnaire (p = 0.823) and the subjective chronotype according to Morning Evening Questionnaire (MEQ) scores distribution (p = 0.464) did not differ between AD and HC. However, DLMO occurred significantly later (55 min; p = 0.028), and melatonin secretion following DLMO was significantly decreased in AD patients compared to HC.CONCLUSION: Initial evening secretion of melatonin proves to be delayed and mildly impaired in patients with a mild/moderate form of Alzheimer disease while patients' subjective sleep parameters and chronotype are reported to be similar to those of HC. These results indicate that subclinical altered patterns of melatonin secretion occur in subjects with AD at an early stage of the disease.",
author = "Raffaele Manni and Riccardo Cremascoli and Carlo Perretti and {De Icco}, Roberto and Marta Picascia and Cristina Ghezzi and Silvia Cerri and Elena Sinforiani and Michele Terzaghi",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleep.2019.04.018",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "122--126",
journal = "Sleep Medicine",
issn = "1389-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evening melatonin timing secretion in real life conditions in patients with Alzheimer disease of mild to moderate severity

AU - Manni, Raffaele

AU - Cremascoli, Riccardo

AU - Perretti, Carlo

AU - De Icco, Roberto

AU - Picascia, Marta

AU - Ghezzi, Cristina

AU - Cerri, Silvia

AU - Sinforiani, Elena

AU - Terzaghi, Michele

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/5/31

Y1 - 2019/5/31

N2 - BACKGROUND: Circadian dysfunction is thought to take part in the pathogenesis of sleep disorders in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in AD pathophysiology itself.OBJECTIVE: Our study aims to calculate dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) secretion in order to define the circadian phase in patients with AD at an early stage of the disease.METHODS: Twenty-one patients (M/F: 11/10; mean age 74.1 ± 5.4 years; mean disease duration 3.4 ± 1.6 years) with a diagnosis of AD and 17 healthy controls (HC; M/F: 10/7; mean age 67.47 ± 3.8 years) were investigated for subjective nocturnal sleep quality and chronotype, for DLMO and quantitative aspects of the evening melatonin secretion by means of a 5-point in-home evening melatonin saliva test.RESULTS: Subjective sleep quality score on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI) above 5 (p = 0.24), insomnia frequency as measured by Sleep Condition Indicator Questionnaire (p = 0.823) and the subjective chronotype according to Morning Evening Questionnaire (MEQ) scores distribution (p = 0.464) did not differ between AD and HC. However, DLMO occurred significantly later (55 min; p = 0.028), and melatonin secretion following DLMO was significantly decreased in AD patients compared to HC.CONCLUSION: Initial evening secretion of melatonin proves to be delayed and mildly impaired in patients with a mild/moderate form of Alzheimer disease while patients' subjective sleep parameters and chronotype are reported to be similar to those of HC. These results indicate that subclinical altered patterns of melatonin secretion occur in subjects with AD at an early stage of the disease.

AB - BACKGROUND: Circadian dysfunction is thought to take part in the pathogenesis of sleep disorders in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in AD pathophysiology itself.OBJECTIVE: Our study aims to calculate dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) secretion in order to define the circadian phase in patients with AD at an early stage of the disease.METHODS: Twenty-one patients (M/F: 11/10; mean age 74.1 ± 5.4 years; mean disease duration 3.4 ± 1.6 years) with a diagnosis of AD and 17 healthy controls (HC; M/F: 10/7; mean age 67.47 ± 3.8 years) were investigated for subjective nocturnal sleep quality and chronotype, for DLMO and quantitative aspects of the evening melatonin secretion by means of a 5-point in-home evening melatonin saliva test.RESULTS: Subjective sleep quality score on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI) above 5 (p = 0.24), insomnia frequency as measured by Sleep Condition Indicator Questionnaire (p = 0.823) and the subjective chronotype according to Morning Evening Questionnaire (MEQ) scores distribution (p = 0.464) did not differ between AD and HC. However, DLMO occurred significantly later (55 min; p = 0.028), and melatonin secretion following DLMO was significantly decreased in AD patients compared to HC.CONCLUSION: Initial evening secretion of melatonin proves to be delayed and mildly impaired in patients with a mild/moderate form of Alzheimer disease while patients' subjective sleep parameters and chronotype are reported to be similar to those of HC. These results indicate that subclinical altered patterns of melatonin secretion occur in subjects with AD at an early stage of the disease.

U2 - 10.1016/j.sleep.2019.04.018

DO - 10.1016/j.sleep.2019.04.018

M3 - Article

C2 - 31622953

VL - 63

SP - 122

EP - 126

JO - Sleep Medicine

JF - Sleep Medicine

SN - 1389-9457

ER -