Evidence for a "gender paradox" in diabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: Adverse preprocedural risk but favorable long-term clinical outcome in women

Giacomo Boccuzzi, Guido Belli, Paolo Pagnotta, Marco Luciano Rossi, Dennis Zavalloni Parenti, Francesco Milone, Annachiara Aldrovandi, Melania Scatturin, Emanuela Morenghi, Patrizia Presbitero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of gender on procedural and late clinical outcome in a large cohort of consecutive diabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a single center. Methods. The study included a cohort of 542 consecutive diabetic patients (414 men, 128 women), undergoing PCI for stable and unstable angina. Clinical events were assessed every 6 months for a mean follow-up period of 24 months. Results. Compared to men, women were older and less often smokers. Insulin requirement was present in a substantially higher percentage of women than men (27 vs 18%, p = 0.03). Presentation with stable angina was more frequent in women, whereas silent ischemia was more prevalent in men. Adverse baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics in women (smaller vessels and longer lesion lengths) were associated with a more frequent need for multiple coronary stenting (23 vs 15% women vs men, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)962-967
Number of pages6
JournalItalian Heart Journal
Volume6
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Female gender
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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