Evidence for cytoskeletal changes secondary to plasma membrane functional alterations in the in vitro cell response to Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin

Gianfranco Donelli, Carla Fiorentini, Paola Matarrese, Loredana Falzano, Rita Cardines, Paola Mastrantonio, Dean W. Payne, Richard W. Titball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To investigate the mode of action of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin, MDCK cells were treated with purified toxin and incubated at 37 °C for up to 24 h. Exposure to epsilon-toxin caused a time-dependent decrease in cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. After 30 min of treatment retraction of the cell body and the emission of filopodia were detectable in a number of cells. Longer exposure resulted in cell rounding and cell blebbing which reached a maximum after 5 h of toxin treatment. A parallel modification in the cytoskeleton was also detected. Actin marginalization and the entanglement of microtubules and intermediate filaments were observed by fluorescence microscopy after 30 min of toxin exposure. Functional alterations of the plasma membrane of MDCK cells were assessed by flow cytometry. After 10 or 30 min of intoxication an increase in cell volume was detected, indicating an alteration in plasma membrane permeability. These findings provide evidence for cytoskeletal changes and plasma membrane functional alterations in the in vitro cell response to C. perfringens epsilon-toxin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-156
Number of pages12
JournalComparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2003

Keywords

  • Clostridium perfringens
  • Cytoskeleton
  • Epsilon-toxin
  • Membrane alteration
  • Vascular permeability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evidence for cytoskeletal changes secondary to plasma membrane functional alterations in the in vitro cell response to Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this