Exercise performance in patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension; Effects of nifedipine-induced acute blood pressure reduction

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Abstract

In untreated patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension, exercise induces an abnormal increase in blood pressure; the influences of this increase on exercise were evaluated by a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX) performed in control conditions (step 1) and during acute blood pressure reduction (step 2). Patients were classified as (1) normotensive (resting diastolic blood pressure [BPd] 2) at peak exercise and at ventilatory anaerobic threshold was 26.1 ± 1.1 and 17.2 ± 0.5 ml/min/kg, 25.4 ± 1.1 and 16.9 ± 0.8 ml/min/kg, and 26.4 ± 1.3 and 17.5 ± 1.2 ml/min/kg in normotensive subjects, those with mild hypertension, and those with moderate to severe hypertension, respectively. Fourteen normotensive subjects, six with mild hypertension, and nine with moderate to severe hypertension participated to step 2 (nifedipine vs placebo, double-blind crossover). Nifedipine reduced blood pressure at rest and at peak exercise in those with hypertension. Peak exercise V̇O2 was unaffected by nifedipine in both normotensive subjects and those with hypertension. With nifedipine, ventilatory anaerobic threshold occurred earlier and at a lower V̇O2 in mild and in moderate to severe hypertension (ΔV̇O2 = -1.9 and -2.4 ml/min/kg, respectively). These findings might be due to nifedipine-induced redistribution of blood flow during exercise and might be the reason for the complaint of weakness after blood pressure reduction in hypertensive subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1591-1596
Number of pages6
JournalChest
Volume101
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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