Exogenous adult postmortem neural precursors attenuate secondary degeneration and promote myelin sparing and functional recovery following experimental spinal sord injury

Stephana Carelli, Toniella Giallongo, Giovanni Marfia, Davide Merli, Luisa Ottobrini, Anna Degrassi, Michele D. Basso, Anna Maria Di Giulio, Alfredo Gorio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating clinical condition, characterized by a complex of neurological dysfunctions. Neural stem cells from the subventricular zone of the forebrain have been considered a potential tool for cell replacement therapies. We recently isolated a subclass of neural progenitors from the cadaver of mouse donors. These cells, named postmortem neural precursor cells (PM-NPCs), express both erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor. Their EPO-dependent differentiation abilities produce a significantly higher percentage of neurons than regular NSCs. The cholinergic yield is also higher. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential repair properties of PM-NPCs in a mouse model of traumatic SCI. Labeled PM-NPCs were administered intravenously; then the functional recovery and the fate of transplanted cells were studied. Animals transplanted with PM-NPCs showed a remarkable improved recovery of hindlimb function that was evaluated up to 90 days after lesion. This was accompanied by reduced myelin loss, counteraction of the invasion of the lesion site by the inflammatory cells, and an attenuation of secondary degeneration. PM-NPCs migrate mostly at the injury site, where they survive at a significantly higher extent than classical NSCs. These cells accumulate at the edges of the lesion, where a reach neuropile is formed by MAP2- and b-tubulin III-positive transplanted cells that are also mostly labeled by anti-ChAT antibodies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)703-719
Number of pages17
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Animal behavior
  • Inflammation
  • Neural stem cells
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Spinal cord injury (SCI)
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

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