Experimental arterial thrombosis in genetically or diet induced hyperlipidemia in rats: Role of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors and prevention by low-intensity oral anticoagulation

A. De Curtis, M. C. D'Adamo, C. Amore, R. Polishchuck, A. Di Castelnuovo, M. B. Donati, L. Iacoviello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To investigate the relationship among lipids, coagulation and thrombosis in the absence of atherosclerosis, spontaneous or dietary-induced hyperlipidemic (FHL) rats were studied. FHL showed higher levels of coagulation factors VII, IX, X, VIII and XII and a shortening of the occlusion time (OT) of an artificial arterial prosthesis as compared with normolipidemic (FNL) animals. Damage of abdominal aorta of FHL was followed by increased fibrin deposition in the vascular intima as compared to FNL. After 5 months of cholesterol-rich diet FNL showed increased cholesterol, triglycerides and factor II, VII, IX, X, XII levels. A significant shortening of the OT and increased fibrin deposition was also observed. Two-month diet withdrawal restored the initial condition. Warfarin treatment, at a dose decreasing vitamin K-dependent factor to levels found in FNL, prolonged the OT and reduced fibrin deposition, without modifying F XII or changing lipid profile. An increase in the activated form of F VII was observed. In contrast, no difference was found in F VII clearance. High lipid levels favour the process of thrombus formation by increasing the activation of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Low-dose warfarin treatment reverts the prothrombotic effect of hyperlipidemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1440-1448
Number of pages9
JournalThrombosis and Haemostasis
Volume86
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Arterial thrombosis
  • Coagulation factors
  • Lipids
  • Rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Experimental arterial thrombosis in genetically or diet induced hyperlipidemia in rats: Role of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors and prevention by low-intensity oral anticoagulation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this