Exploring the potential of MEMS gyroscopes: Successfully using sensors in typical industrial motion control applications

Riccardo Antonello, Roberto Oboe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advent of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology has enabled the development of miniaturized, low-cost, low-power sensors that are becoming more and more competitive with respect to their macroscale counterparts. The competitiveness of MEMS sensors largely resides in their reduced cost, size, and power requirements, including all those features that are strictly correlated with the miniaturization and batch fabrication processes involved in their manufacture. In addition to providing competitive alternatives to existing solutions, MEMS technology has also made possible the development of completely new devices or applications where microscale phenomena are effectively pursued to achieve results that would be unfeasible at a macroscale, e.g., in the case of inkjet printing heads or the micromirror arrays for video projectors [1].

Original languageEnglish
Article number6173644
Pages (from-to)14-24
Number of pages11
JournalIEEE Industrial Electronics Magazine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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Gyroscopes
Motion control
MEMS
Sensors
Printing
Costs
Fabrication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Exploring the potential of MEMS gyroscopes : Successfully using sensors in typical industrial motion control applications. / Antonello, Riccardo; Oboe, Roberto.

In: IEEE Industrial Electronics Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 1, 6173644, 03.2012, p. 14-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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