Exposure of mice to cigarette smoke and/or light causes DNA alterations in heart and aorta

Alberto Izzotti, Francesco D'Agostini, Roumen Balansky, Paolo Degan, Tanya M. Pennisi, Vernon E. Steele, Silvio De Flora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other chronic degenerative diseases. UV-containing light is the most ubiquitous DNA-damaging agent existing in nature, but its possible role in cardiovascular diseases had never been suspected before, although it is known that mortality for cardiovascular diseases is increased during periods with high temperature and solar irradiation. We evaluated whether exposure of Swiss CD-1 mice to environmental CS (ECS) and UV-C-covered halogen quartz lamps, either individually or in combination, can cause DNA damage in heart and aorta cells. Nucleotide alterations were evaluated by 32P postlabeling methods and by HPLC-electrochemical detection. The whole-body exposure of mice to ECS considerably increased the levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and of bulky DNA adducts in both heart and aorta. Surprisingly, even exposure to a light that simulated solar irradiation induced oxidatively generated damage in both tissues. The genotoxic effects of UV light in internal organs is tentatively amenable to formation of unidentified long-lived mutagenic products in the skin of irradiated mice. Nucleotide alterations were even more pronounced when the mice were exposed to smoke and/or light during the first 5 weeks of life rather than during adulthood for an equivalent period of time. Although the pathogenetic meaning is uncertain, DNA damage in heart and aorta may tentatively be related to cardiomyopathies and to the atherogenesis process, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalMutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
Volume644
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 26 2008

Fingerprint

Smoke
Tobacco Products
Aorta
Light
Cardiovascular Diseases
DNA
Ultraviolet Rays
DNA Damage
Nucleotides
Quartz
Halogens
DNA Adducts
Cardiomyopathies
Atherosclerosis
Chronic Disease
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Skin
Temperature
Mortality
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Aorta
  • DNA adducts
  • Environmental cigarette smoke
  • Heart
  • Oxidatively damaged DNA
  • UV-containing light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Exposure of mice to cigarette smoke and/or light causes DNA alterations in heart and aorta. / Izzotti, Alberto; D'Agostini, Francesco; Balansky, Roumen; Degan, Paolo; Pennisi, Tanya M.; Steele, Vernon E.; De Flora, Silvio.

In: Mutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, Vol. 644, No. 1-2, 26.09.2008, p. 38-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Izzotti, Alberto ; D'Agostini, Francesco ; Balansky, Roumen ; Degan, Paolo ; Pennisi, Tanya M. ; Steele, Vernon E. ; De Flora, Silvio. / Exposure of mice to cigarette smoke and/or light causes DNA alterations in heart and aorta. In: Mutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis. 2008 ; Vol. 644, No. 1-2. pp. 38-42.
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