Exposure to indoor background radiation and urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage

Alessandra Sperati, Damiano D. Abeni, Christer Tagesson, Francesco Forastiere, Maria Miceli, Olav Axelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated whether exposure to indoor γ-radiation and radon might be associated with enough free radical formation to increase urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of DNA damage, due to a hydroxyl radical attack at the C8 of guanine. Indoor radon and γ-radiation levels were measured in 32 dwellings for 6 months by solid-state nuclear track detectors and thermoluminescent dosimeters, respectively. Urine samples for 8-OHdG determinations were obtained from 63 healthy adult subjects living in the measured dwellings. An overall tendency toward increasing levels of 8-OHdG with increasing levels of radon and γ-radiation was seen in the females, presumably due to their estimated longer occupancy in the dwellings measured. Different models were considered for females, with the steepest slopes obtained for γ-radiation with a coefficient of 0.500 (log nmol/l of 8-OHdG for each unit increase of γ-radiation on a log scale) (p <0.01), and increasing to 0.632 (p = 0.035), but with larger variance, when radon was included in the model. In conclusion, there seems to be an effect of indoor radioactivity on the urinary excretion of 8-OHdG for females, who are estimated to have a higher occupancy in the dwellings measured than for males, for whom occupational and other agents may also influence 8-OHdG excretion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-215
Number of pages3
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume107
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • γ-radiation
  • Free radicals
  • Radon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Exposure to indoor background radiation and urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this