Expression and modulation of IFN-γ-inducible chemokines (IP-10, Mig, and I-TAC) in human brain endothelium and astrocytes: Possible relevance for the immune invasion of the central nervous system and the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

Andrea Salmaggi, Emilio Ciusani, Marco De Rossi, Maurizio Gelati, Anna Dufour, Elena Corsini, Stefano Pagano, Rossana Baccalini, Elisabetta Ferrero, Silvia Scabini, Valerio Silei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) mediated by blood-derived immune cells invading the CNS. This invasion could be determined by chemokines, and their role within the MS-affected brain is still poorly defined. We investigated the expression by RT-PCR and protein release by ELISA of the interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible chemokines in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and astrocytes. The monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig) behaves as a homing chemokine constitutively expressed in HBMECs and astrocytes, whereas the IFN-γ-inducible 10-kDa protein (IP-10) and IFN-inducible T cell alpha-chemoattractant (I-TAC) are induced only after inflammatory stimuli. The biologic activity of IFN-γ-inducible chemokines from an endothelial source was analyzed, and the transendothelial migration of activated lymphocytes was partly antagonized by specific antibodies, especially anti-Mig antibody. Our data highlight the capability of cells of the CNS to activate the chemoattractant machinery in a proinflammatory environment and in MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-640
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Interferon and Cytokine Research
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Cell Biology

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