Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor genes in partially overlapping monoclonal B-cell populations from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

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Abstract

B lymphocytes were purified from the peripheral blood of 30 B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients and tested for the ability to produce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro. Fifteen Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-stimulated, but not unstimulated, B-cell suspensions produced G-CSF in short-term cultures. Accordingly, G-CSF mRNA was detected only in SAC-stimulated B cells. Five CLL B-cell fractions that released G-CSF following exposure to SAC were also incubated with CD40 or anti-μ antibodies in the presence or absence of recombinant (r) interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-4. The 5 cell suspensions produced G-CSF only on culture with CD40 monoclonal antibody in combination with rIL-2 or rIL-4. CD5+ B lymphocytes, which represent the normal counterparts of most B-CLL proliterations, did not produce G-CSF under any of the above culture conditions. G-CSF produced by leukemic B lymphocytes was biologically active, because conditioned media of SAC-stimulated cells supported the in vitro growth of myeloid colonies from normal bone marrow progenitors. The colony stimulating activity of CLL B-cell supernatants was ascribed to both G-CSF and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. G-CSF receptors (G-CSFRs) were detected on freshly isolated B lymphocytes from 7 of 11 B-CLL patients; 5 of these cell suspensions produced G-CSF in culture, whereas 2 did not. rG-CSF rescued 3 of the 7 G-CSFR+ cell fractions from spontaneous apoptosis but had no effect on their in vitro proliferation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2861-2869
Number of pages9
JournalBlood
Volume87
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 1996

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Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptors
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Genes
Cells
B-Lymphocytes
Lymphocytes
Population
Staphylococcus aureus
Suspensions
Cell culture
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Conditioned Culture Medium
Interleukin-4
Interleukin-2
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Bone
Blood
Bone Marrow
Monoclonal Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

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title = "Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor genes in partially overlapping monoclonal B-cell populations from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients",
abstract = "B lymphocytes were purified from the peripheral blood of 30 B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients and tested for the ability to produce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro. Fifteen Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-stimulated, but not unstimulated, B-cell suspensions produced G-CSF in short-term cultures. Accordingly, G-CSF mRNA was detected only in SAC-stimulated B cells. Five CLL B-cell fractions that released G-CSF following exposure to SAC were also incubated with CD40 or anti-μ antibodies in the presence or absence of recombinant (r) interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-4. The 5 cell suspensions produced G-CSF only on culture with CD40 monoclonal antibody in combination with rIL-2 or rIL-4. CD5+ B lymphocytes, which represent the normal counterparts of most B-CLL proliterations, did not produce G-CSF under any of the above culture conditions. G-CSF produced by leukemic B lymphocytes was biologically active, because conditioned media of SAC-stimulated cells supported the in vitro growth of myeloid colonies from normal bone marrow progenitors. The colony stimulating activity of CLL B-cell supernatants was ascribed to both G-CSF and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. G-CSF receptors (G-CSFRs) were detected on freshly isolated B lymphocytes from 7 of 11 B-CLL patients; 5 of these cell suspensions produced G-CSF in culture, whereas 2 did not. rG-CSF rescued 3 of the 7 G-CSFR+ cell fractions from spontaneous apoptosis but had no effect on their in vitro proliferation.",
author = "Anna Corcione and Corrias, {Maria Valeria} and Silvia Daniele and Simona Zupo and Mauro Spriano and Vito Pistoia",
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T1 - Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor genes in partially overlapping monoclonal B-cell populations from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

AU - Corcione, Anna

AU - Corrias, Maria Valeria

AU - Daniele, Silvia

AU - Zupo, Simona

AU - Spriano, Mauro

AU - Pistoia, Vito

PY - 1996/4/1

Y1 - 1996/4/1

N2 - B lymphocytes were purified from the peripheral blood of 30 B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients and tested for the ability to produce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro. Fifteen Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-stimulated, but not unstimulated, B-cell suspensions produced G-CSF in short-term cultures. Accordingly, G-CSF mRNA was detected only in SAC-stimulated B cells. Five CLL B-cell fractions that released G-CSF following exposure to SAC were also incubated with CD40 or anti-μ antibodies in the presence or absence of recombinant (r) interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-4. The 5 cell suspensions produced G-CSF only on culture with CD40 monoclonal antibody in combination with rIL-2 or rIL-4. CD5+ B lymphocytes, which represent the normal counterparts of most B-CLL proliterations, did not produce G-CSF under any of the above culture conditions. G-CSF produced by leukemic B lymphocytes was biologically active, because conditioned media of SAC-stimulated cells supported the in vitro growth of myeloid colonies from normal bone marrow progenitors. The colony stimulating activity of CLL B-cell supernatants was ascribed to both G-CSF and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. G-CSF receptors (G-CSFRs) were detected on freshly isolated B lymphocytes from 7 of 11 B-CLL patients; 5 of these cell suspensions produced G-CSF in culture, whereas 2 did not. rG-CSF rescued 3 of the 7 G-CSFR+ cell fractions from spontaneous apoptosis but had no effect on their in vitro proliferation.

AB - B lymphocytes were purified from the peripheral blood of 30 B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients and tested for the ability to produce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro. Fifteen Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-stimulated, but not unstimulated, B-cell suspensions produced G-CSF in short-term cultures. Accordingly, G-CSF mRNA was detected only in SAC-stimulated B cells. Five CLL B-cell fractions that released G-CSF following exposure to SAC were also incubated with CD40 or anti-μ antibodies in the presence or absence of recombinant (r) interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-4. The 5 cell suspensions produced G-CSF only on culture with CD40 monoclonal antibody in combination with rIL-2 or rIL-4. CD5+ B lymphocytes, which represent the normal counterparts of most B-CLL proliterations, did not produce G-CSF under any of the above culture conditions. G-CSF produced by leukemic B lymphocytes was biologically active, because conditioned media of SAC-stimulated cells supported the in vitro growth of myeloid colonies from normal bone marrow progenitors. The colony stimulating activity of CLL B-cell supernatants was ascribed to both G-CSF and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. G-CSF receptors (G-CSFRs) were detected on freshly isolated B lymphocytes from 7 of 11 B-CLL patients; 5 of these cell suspensions produced G-CSF in culture, whereas 2 did not. rG-CSF rescued 3 of the 7 G-CSFR+ cell fractions from spontaneous apoptosis but had no effect on their in vitro proliferation.

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