Expression profiling in a mammalian host reveals the strong induction of genes encoding LysM domain-containing proteins in Enterococcus faecium

Margherita Cacaci, Caroline Giraud, Loic Leger, Riccardo Torelli, Cecilia Martini, Brunella Posteraro, Valentina Palmieri, Maurizio Sanguinetti, Francesca Bugli, Axel Hartke

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Abstract

Enterococcus faecium is an important health care-associated pathogen that is difficult to treat due to the high level of antibiotic resistance of clinical isolates. The identification of new potential therapeutic targets or vaccination strategies is therefore urgently needed. In this regard, we carried out a transcriptomic analysis of the E. faecium vancomycin-resistant strain AUS0004, comparing the gene expression of bacteria grown under laboratory conditions and bacteria isolated from an infection site. This analysis highlighted more than 360 genes potentially induced under infection conditions. Owing to their expression profiles, four LysM domain-containing proteins were characterized in more detail. The EFAU004_01059, 1150 and 494 proteins are highly homologous, whereas EFAU004_01209 has a unique domain-architecture and sequence. The analysis of corresponding mutants showed that all LysM proteins played relevant roles in the infection process of E. faecium in mice. The EFAU004_01209 mutant also displayed profound morphological modifications, suggesting it has a role in cell wall synthesis or cell division. Furthermore, the adhesion to kidney cells and growth of the mutant was affected in human urine. All these phenotypes and the surface exposure of EFAU004_01209 identify this protein as an interesting new drug target in E. faecium.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12412
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

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