Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal

The future of lung support lies in the history

Manish Kaushik, Marzena Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, Dinna N. Cruz, A. Ferrer-Nadal, Catarina Teixeira, Elena Iglesias, Jeong Chul Kim, Antonio Braschi, Pasquale Piccinni, Claudio Ronco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extracorporeal organ support in patients with dysfunction of vital organs like the kidney, heart, and liver has proven helpful in bridging the patients to recovery or more definitive therapy. Mechanical ventilation in patients with respiratory failure, although indispensable, has been associated with worsening injury to the lungs, termed ventilator-induced lung injury. Application of lung-protective ventilation strategies are limited by inevitable hypercapnia and hypercapnic acidosis. Various alternative extracorporeal strategies, proposed more than 30 years ago, to combat hypercapnia are now more readily available. In particular, the venovenous approach to effective carbon dioxide removal, which involves minimal invasiveness comparable to renal replacement therapy, appears to be very promising. The clinical applications of these extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal therapies may extend beyond just lung protection in ventilated patients. This article summarizes the rationale, technology and clinical application of various extracorporeal lung assist techniques available for clinical use, and some of the future perspectives in the field.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-106
Number of pages13
JournalBlood Purification
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Carbon Dioxide
History
Lung
Hypercapnia
Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury
Renal Replacement Therapy
Lung Injury
Acidosis
Artificial Respiration
Respiratory Insufficiency
Ventilation
Technology
Kidney
Liver
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
  • Lung support
  • Lung-protective ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Kaushik, M., Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, M., Cruz, D. N., Ferrer-Nadal, A., Teixeira, C., Iglesias, E., ... Ronco, C. (2012). Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: The future of lung support lies in the history. Blood Purification, 34(2), 94-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000341904

Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal : The future of lung support lies in the history. / Kaushik, Manish; Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, Marzena; Cruz, Dinna N.; Ferrer-Nadal, A.; Teixeira, Catarina; Iglesias, Elena; Kim, Jeong Chul; Braschi, Antonio; Piccinni, Pasquale; Ronco, Claudio.

In: Blood Purification, Vol. 34, No. 2, 10.2012, p. 94-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaushik, M, Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, M, Cruz, DN, Ferrer-Nadal, A, Teixeira, C, Iglesias, E, Kim, JC, Braschi, A, Piccinni, P & Ronco, C 2012, 'Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: The future of lung support lies in the history', Blood Purification, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 94-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000341904
Kaushik M, Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz M, Cruz DN, Ferrer-Nadal A, Teixeira C, Iglesias E et al. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: The future of lung support lies in the history. Blood Purification. 2012 Oct;34(2):94-106. https://doi.org/10.1159/000341904
Kaushik, Manish ; Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, Marzena ; Cruz, Dinna N. ; Ferrer-Nadal, A. ; Teixeira, Catarina ; Iglesias, Elena ; Kim, Jeong Chul ; Braschi, Antonio ; Piccinni, Pasquale ; Ronco, Claudio. / Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal : The future of lung support lies in the history. In: Blood Purification. 2012 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 94-106.
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