EYES Are The Window to the Mind: Eye-Tracking Technology as a Novel Approach to Study Clinical Characteristics of ADHD: Psychiatry Research

V. Levantini, P. Muratori, E. Inguaggiato, G. Masi, A. Milone, E. Valente, A. Tonacci, L. Billeci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In recent years, the study of eye movements has increasingly become a window into neurological function and processes. This paper reports data about applications of eye-tracking technology in the field of neurodevelopmental disorders, especially in studying the clinical characteristics of ADHD. These studies indicated that eye-tracking approach represents a non-invasive methodology to test specific domains, such as attention networks and inhibition control, in an objectively and reliable way in youths. Although the studies results are still not conclusive, eye-tracking represents a potential valid support for clinicians in identifying specific biomarkers to orient ADHD diagnosis and the best intervention strategies. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychiatry Res.
Volume290
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Attention
  • Eye movement
  • adolescent
  • Article
  • attention
  • attention deficit disorder
  • autism
  • blinking
  • child
  • clinical assessment
  • clinical feature
  • disease marker
  • eye fixation
  • eye tracking
  • human
  • inhibition (psychology)
  • mental disease
  • non invasive procedure
  • physician
  • priority journal
  • pupil
  • saccadic eye movement
  • smooth pursuit eye movement
  • eye movement
  • female
  • male
  • motivation
  • oculography
  • pathophysiology
  • physiology
  • psychology
  • Adolescent
  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
  • Eye Movement Measurements
  • Eye Movements
  • Female
  • Goals
  • Humans
  • Inhibition, Psychological
  • Male

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