Facets and determinants of quality of life in patients with recurrent high grade glioma

A. R. Giovagnoli, A. Silvani, E. Colombo, A. Boiardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess patients with recurrent high grade brain glioma with the aim of evaluating facets of quality of life (QOL) and their association with mood, cognition, and physical performance. Methods: Ninety four glioma patients (four groups with different duration of glioma recurrence) were compared with 24 patients with other chronic neurological diseases and 48 healthy subjects. The Functional Living Index-Cancer (FLIC) provided QOL self evaluations, and standardised scales and neuropsychological tests assessed physical performance, mood, and cognition. Results: In glioma patients, factor analysis of the FLIC items documented five domains: Psychological well being, Role/sociability, Inner experience of disease, Isolation/sharing, and Nausea. Higher FLIC total scores were related to better cognition, physical performances, and mood, and lower grading; poorer Psychological well being and worse Inner experience of disease to depressed mood; minor Role/sociability to worse cognitive and physical performances and higher grading; worse Nausea to longer disease duration. Compared with healthy subjects, all glioma groups were cognitively impaired and more anxious, and two groups with short duration of recurrence were also more depressed. Patients with chronic neurological diseases showed worse mood and cognitive abilities compared with healthy subjects, but performed attention tests better than glioma patients. Glioma and chronic disease patients showed similar FLIC scores and autonomy. Conclusions: These results show that QOL of recurrent high grade glioma patients is multifaceted and determined by multiple factors. Disease severity does not necessarily eliminate the possibility of expressing personal feelings and opinions which could provide criteria for clinical decision making and psychological support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)562-568
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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Glioma
Quality of Life
Cognition
Healthy Volunteers
Chronic Disease
Psychology
Nausea
Neoplasms
Recurrence
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Aptitude
Neuropsychological Tests
Statistical Factor Analysis
Emotions
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Facets and determinants of quality of life in patients with recurrent high grade glioma. / Giovagnoli, A. R.; Silvani, A.; Colombo, E.; Boiardi, A.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 76, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 562-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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