Factors associated with progression to AIDS and mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected patients with hemophilia followed up since seroconversion.

E. Santagostino, A. Gringeri, D. Cultraro, F. Tradati, L. Siracusano, A. Marinoni, P. M. Mannucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Progression to AIDS and death were evaluated in 112 patients, 84 with hemophilia A and 28 with hemophilia B. Seroconversion period and age at seroconversion were similar in both groups. 36/112 patients died: 21/84 with hemophilia A (25%) and 15/28 (54%) with hemophilia B. Mean survival time was 11.7 years. The 10-year cumulative survival was 75.8%. It was lower in hemophilia B (56.2%) compared to hemophilia A patients (82.4%; p = 0.002). 37 patients (33%) developed full-blown AIDS: 26 with hemophilia A (31%) and 11 with hemophilia B (39%). Mean AIDS-free survival time was 11.4 years. The 10-year cumulative AIDS-free survival was 71.2%. It was 74.8% in hemophilia A and 60.3% in hemophilia B patients. CD4 counts lower than 200/cmm occurred in 62 patients (56%): 45 with hemophilia A (54%) and 17 with hemophilia B (63%). The mean time to CD4 counts lower than 200 was 9.4 years. Mean survival time in older seroconverters (35 year old or more) was shorter than in younger (9.5 vs. 11.7 years, p <0.05). Mean CD4 cell counts at seroconversion were similar in hemophilia A and B patients and in different age classes at seroconversion. CD4 cell counts at seroconversion affected the survival: 90% seroconverters with CD4 cell counts of 800/cmm or more were alive at 10 years vs. 60% of seroconverters with CD4 cell counts lower than 800 (p <0.05).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-380
Number of pages10
JournalCellular and Molecular Biology
Volume41
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

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