Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants

Paola Roggero, Elena Cataliotti, Laura Ulla, Susanna Stuflesser, Gabriella Nebbia, Davide Bracaloni, Alessandro Lucianetti, Bruno Gridelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nutrition deficiencies are common in children with chronic liver disease. To determine whether age, hepatic dysfunction, or energy intake influences this malnutrition, we evaluated the nutritional status of 49 children aged 2.5 mo to 13 y (mean: 35 mo; median: 12 mo). The children were divided into two groups according to age: group 1-29 patients aged ≤ 1 y (mean: 7 mo; median: 7 mo); and group 2-20 patients > 1 y (mean: 75 mo; median: 59 mo). Hepatic dysfunction was defined according to the Malatack criteria. Seventy-two-hour dietary intakes were recorded by a nutritionist. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric measures when the patients were enrolled on the waiting list for liver transplants. We evaluated the following indexes: weight, height, fat body mass, and lean body mass on the basis of height-age (age at which height reached 50th Italian height percentile). Mean height Z scores were low in both groups, but the difference was not significant. Mean weight Z scores and mean percentages of fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.001) in group 1 than in group 2 patients. In group 2, lean body mass and fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.05) in patients with moderate-to-severe hepatic failure than in patients with mild hepatic dysfunction. The mean energy intake was in the range of the recommended daily allowances for age but was insufficient for both groups of patients. The evidence of significant acute and chronic malnutrition confirmed the need for nutritional support, especially for younger and older children with moderate-to-severe hepatic dysfunction. We emphasize the necessity of accurate assessment of nutritional status by simple anthropometric measurements to be sure of the effects and adequacy of the nutritional intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1852-1857
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume65
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1997

Fingerprint

Child Nutrition Disorders
liver transplant
malnutrition
Transplants
Liver
Fat Body
fat body
Nutritional Status
nutritional status
liver
lean body mass
Energy Intake
Malnutrition
energy intake
Weights and Measures
Recommended Dietary Allowances
liver failure
Waiting Lists
nutritional intervention
Nutritionists

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Childhood liver disease
  • Children
  • End-stage liver disease
  • Extrahepatic biliary atresia
  • Infants
  • Liver transplantation
  • Malnutrition
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Roggero, P., Cataliotti, E., Ulla, L., Stuflesser, S., Nebbia, G., Bracaloni, D., ... Gridelli, B. (1997). Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 65(6), 1852-1857.

Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants. / Roggero, Paola; Cataliotti, Elena; Ulla, Laura; Stuflesser, Susanna; Nebbia, Gabriella; Bracaloni, Davide; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Gridelli, Bruno.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 65, No. 6, 06.1997, p. 1852-1857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roggero, P, Cataliotti, E, Ulla, L, Stuflesser, S, Nebbia, G, Bracaloni, D, Lucianetti, A & Gridelli, B 1997, 'Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 65, no. 6, pp. 1852-1857.
Roggero P, Cataliotti E, Ulla L, Stuflesser S, Nebbia G, Bracaloni D et al. Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1997 Jun;65(6):1852-1857.
Roggero, Paola ; Cataliotti, Elena ; Ulla, Laura ; Stuflesser, Susanna ; Nebbia, Gabriella ; Bracaloni, Davide ; Lucianetti, Alessandro ; Gridelli, Bruno. / Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1997 ; Vol. 65, No. 6. pp. 1852-1857.
@article{287fdb21c2894cf986d3533e407e09f8,
title = "Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants",
abstract = "Nutrition deficiencies are common in children with chronic liver disease. To determine whether age, hepatic dysfunction, or energy intake influences this malnutrition, we evaluated the nutritional status of 49 children aged 2.5 mo to 13 y (mean: 35 mo; median: 12 mo). The children were divided into two groups according to age: group 1-29 patients aged ≤ 1 y (mean: 7 mo; median: 7 mo); and group 2-20 patients > 1 y (mean: 75 mo; median: 59 mo). Hepatic dysfunction was defined according to the Malatack criteria. Seventy-two-hour dietary intakes were recorded by a nutritionist. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric measures when the patients were enrolled on the waiting list for liver transplants. We evaluated the following indexes: weight, height, fat body mass, and lean body mass on the basis of height-age (age at which height reached 50th Italian height percentile). Mean height Z scores were low in both groups, but the difference was not significant. Mean weight Z scores and mean percentages of fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.001) in group 1 than in group 2 patients. In group 2, lean body mass and fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.05) in patients with moderate-to-severe hepatic failure than in patients with mild hepatic dysfunction. The mean energy intake was in the range of the recommended daily allowances for age but was insufficient for both groups of patients. The evidence of significant acute and chronic malnutrition confirmed the need for nutritional support, especially for younger and older children with moderate-to-severe hepatic dysfunction. We emphasize the necessity of accurate assessment of nutritional status by simple anthropometric measurements to be sure of the effects and adequacy of the nutritional intervention.",
keywords = "Anthropometry, Childhood liver disease, Children, End-stage liver disease, Extrahepatic biliary atresia, Infants, Liver transplantation, Malnutrition, Nutrition",
author = "Paola Roggero and Elena Cataliotti and Laura Ulla and Susanna Stuflesser and Gabriella Nebbia and Davide Bracaloni and Alessandro Lucianetti and Bruno Gridelli",
year = "1997",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "1852--1857",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors influencing malnutrition in children waiting for liver transplants

AU - Roggero, Paola

AU - Cataliotti, Elena

AU - Ulla, Laura

AU - Stuflesser, Susanna

AU - Nebbia, Gabriella

AU - Bracaloni, Davide

AU - Lucianetti, Alessandro

AU - Gridelli, Bruno

PY - 1997/6

Y1 - 1997/6

N2 - Nutrition deficiencies are common in children with chronic liver disease. To determine whether age, hepatic dysfunction, or energy intake influences this malnutrition, we evaluated the nutritional status of 49 children aged 2.5 mo to 13 y (mean: 35 mo; median: 12 mo). The children were divided into two groups according to age: group 1-29 patients aged ≤ 1 y (mean: 7 mo; median: 7 mo); and group 2-20 patients > 1 y (mean: 75 mo; median: 59 mo). Hepatic dysfunction was defined according to the Malatack criteria. Seventy-two-hour dietary intakes were recorded by a nutritionist. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric measures when the patients were enrolled on the waiting list for liver transplants. We evaluated the following indexes: weight, height, fat body mass, and lean body mass on the basis of height-age (age at which height reached 50th Italian height percentile). Mean height Z scores were low in both groups, but the difference was not significant. Mean weight Z scores and mean percentages of fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.001) in group 1 than in group 2 patients. In group 2, lean body mass and fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.05) in patients with moderate-to-severe hepatic failure than in patients with mild hepatic dysfunction. The mean energy intake was in the range of the recommended daily allowances for age but was insufficient for both groups of patients. The evidence of significant acute and chronic malnutrition confirmed the need for nutritional support, especially for younger and older children with moderate-to-severe hepatic dysfunction. We emphasize the necessity of accurate assessment of nutritional status by simple anthropometric measurements to be sure of the effects and adequacy of the nutritional intervention.

AB - Nutrition deficiencies are common in children with chronic liver disease. To determine whether age, hepatic dysfunction, or energy intake influences this malnutrition, we evaluated the nutritional status of 49 children aged 2.5 mo to 13 y (mean: 35 mo; median: 12 mo). The children were divided into two groups according to age: group 1-29 patients aged ≤ 1 y (mean: 7 mo; median: 7 mo); and group 2-20 patients > 1 y (mean: 75 mo; median: 59 mo). Hepatic dysfunction was defined according to the Malatack criteria. Seventy-two-hour dietary intakes were recorded by a nutritionist. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric measures when the patients were enrolled on the waiting list for liver transplants. We evaluated the following indexes: weight, height, fat body mass, and lean body mass on the basis of height-age (age at which height reached 50th Italian height percentile). Mean height Z scores were low in both groups, but the difference was not significant. Mean weight Z scores and mean percentages of fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.001) in group 1 than in group 2 patients. In group 2, lean body mass and fat body mass were significantly lower (P <0.05) in patients with moderate-to-severe hepatic failure than in patients with mild hepatic dysfunction. The mean energy intake was in the range of the recommended daily allowances for age but was insufficient for both groups of patients. The evidence of significant acute and chronic malnutrition confirmed the need for nutritional support, especially for younger and older children with moderate-to-severe hepatic dysfunction. We emphasize the necessity of accurate assessment of nutritional status by simple anthropometric measurements to be sure of the effects and adequacy of the nutritional intervention.

KW - Anthropometry

KW - Childhood liver disease

KW - Children

KW - End-stage liver disease

KW - Extrahepatic biliary atresia

KW - Infants

KW - Liver transplantation

KW - Malnutrition

KW - Nutrition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031003284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031003284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 1852

EP - 1857

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 6

ER -