Faecal microbiota transplantation as emerging treatment in European countries

Marcello Maida, James Mcilroy, Gianluca Ianiro, Giovanni Cammarota

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections in the world and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Although several antibiotics effectively treat CDI, some individuals do not respond to these drugs and may be cured by transplanting stool from healthy donors. This procedure, termed Faecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT), has demonstrated remarkable efficacy as a treatment for recurrent CDI. FMT has also been investigated in other diseases and disorders where perturbations to the gut microbiota have been theorized to play a causative role in pathogenesis and severity, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although FMT is currently not recommended to cure IBD patients in clinical practice, several studies have recently been carried out with promising results. The aim of future research is therefore to standardize protocols and develop FMT as a therapeutic option for these patients. This review summarizes data on the use of FMT as a treatment for CDI and IBD, with special attention given to studies conducted in European countries.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages177-195
Number of pages19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1050
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Clostridium
Clostridium Infections
Clostridium difficile
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Therapeutics
Cross Infection
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Morbidity
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Mortality

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • European
  • Faecal microbiota transplantation
  • Fecal
  • Inflammatory bowel disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Maida, M., Mcilroy, J., Ianiro, G., & Cammarota, G. (2018). Faecal microbiota transplantation as emerging treatment in European countries. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 177-195). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1050). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72799-8_11

Faecal microbiota transplantation as emerging treatment in European countries. / Maida, Marcello; Mcilroy, James; Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. p. 177-195 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1050).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Maida, M, Mcilroy, J, Ianiro, G & Cammarota, G 2018, Faecal microbiota transplantation as emerging treatment in European countries. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1050, Springer New York LLC, pp. 177-195. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72799-8_11
Maida M, Mcilroy J, Ianiro G, Cammarota G. Faecal microbiota transplantation as emerging treatment in European countries. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2018. p. 177-195. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72799-8_11
Maida, Marcello ; Mcilroy, James ; Ianiro, Gianluca ; Cammarota, Giovanni. / Faecal microbiota transplantation as emerging treatment in European countries. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. pp. 177-195 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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