Family history of hematopoietic malignancies and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): A pooled analysis of 10 211 cases and 11 905 controls from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

Sophia S. Wang, Susan L. Slager, Paul Brennan, Elizabeth A. Holly, Silvia De Sanjose, Leslie Bernstein, Paolo Boffetta, James R. Cerhan, Marc Maynadie, John J. Spinelli, Brian C H Chiu, Pier Luigi Cocco, Fiona Mensah, Yawei Zhang, Alexandra Nieters, Luigino Dal Maso, Paige M. Bracci, Adele Seniori Costantini, Paolo Vineis, Richard K. SeversonEve Roman, Wendy Cozen, Dennis Weisenburger, Scott Davis, Silvia Franceschi, Carlo La Vecchia, Lenka Foretova, Nikolaus Becker, Anthony Staines, Martine Vornanen, Tongzhang Zheng, Patricia Hartge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A role for genetic susceptibility in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is supported by the accumulating evidence of common genetic variations altering NHL risk. However, the pattern of NHL heritability remains poorly understood. We conducted a pooled analysis of 10 211 NHL cases and 11 905 controls from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) to evaluate NHL risk among those with hematopoietic malignancies in first-degree relatives. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of NHL and its subtypes were estimated from unconditional logistic regression models with adjustment for confounders. NHL risk was elevated for individuals who reported first-degree relatives with NHL (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.2-1.9), Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1-2.3), and leukemia (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.2-2.7). Risk was highest among individuals who reported a brother with NHL (OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.6-4.8) and was consistent for all NHL subtypes evaluated. If a first-degree relative had Hodgkin lymphoma, NHL risk was highest if the relative was a parent (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.9). If a first-degree relative had leukemia, NHL risk was highest among women who reported a sister with leukemia (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.6-5.6). The pattern of NHL heritability appeared to be uniform across NHL subtypes, but risk patterns differed by specific hematopoietic malignancies and the sex of the relative, revealing critical clues to disease etiology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3479-3488
Number of pages10
JournalBlood
Volume109
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 15 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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