Family history of liver cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma

Federica Turati, Valeria Edefonti, Renato Talamini, Monica Ferraroni, Matteo Malvezzi, Francesca Bravi, Silvia Franceschi, Maurizio Montella, Jerry Polesel, Antonella Zucchetto, Carlo La Vecchia, Eva Negri, Adriano Decarli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Familial clustering of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been frequently reported in eastern Asiatic countries, where hepatitis B infection is common. Little is known about the relationship between family history of liver cancer and HCC in Western populations. We carried out a case-control study in Italy, involving 229 HCC cases and 431 hospital controls. Data on family history were summarized through a binary indicator (yes/no) and a family history score (FHscore), considering selected family characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from unconditional multiple logistic regression models, including terms for age, sex, study center, education, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, hepatitis B surface antigen, and/or anti-hepatitis C virus positivity. We also performed a meta-analysis on family history of liver cancer and liver cancer updated to April 2011 using random-effects models. After adjustment for chronic infection with hepatitis B/C viruses, family history of liver cancer was associated with HCC risk, when using both the binary indicator (OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.01-5.58) and the FHscore, with increasing ORs for successive score categories. Compared to subjects without family history and no chronic infection with hepatitis B/C viruses, the OR for those exposed to both risk factors was 72.48 (95% CI, 21.92-239.73). In the meta-analysis, based on nine case-control and four cohort studies, for a total of approximately 3,600 liver cancer cases, the pooled relative risk for family history of liver cancer was 2.50 (95% CI, 2.06-3.03). Conclusion: A family history of liver cancer increases HCC risk, independently of hepatitis. The combination of family history of liver cancer and hepatitis B/C serum markers is associated with an over 70-fold elevated HCC risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1416-1425
Number of pages10
JournalHepatology
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

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