Fat oxidation, hormonal and plasma metabolite kinetics during a submaximal incremental test in lean and obese adults

Stefano Lanzi, Franco Codecasa, Mauro Cornacchia, Sabrina Maestrini, Alberto Salvadori, Amelia Brunani, Davide Malatesta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to compare fat oxidation, hormonal and plasma metabolite kinetics during exercise in lean (L) and obese (O) men. Sixteen L and 16 O men [Body Mass Index (BMI): 22.9±0.3 and 39.0±1.4 kg·m -2] performed a submaximal incremental test (Incr) on a cycle-ergometer. Fat oxidation rates (FORs) were determined using indirect calorimetry. A sinusoidal model, including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, translation), was used to describe fat oxidation kinetics and determine the intensity (Fatmax) eliciting maximal fat oxidation. Blood samples were drawn for the hormonal and plasma metabolite determination at each step of Incr. FORs (mg·FFM-1·min-1) were significantly higher from 20 to 30% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇ O 2peak) in O than in L and from 65 to 85% V̇ O2peak in L than in O (p≤0.05). FORs were similar in O and in L from 35 to 60% V̇ O2peak. Fatmax was 17% significantly lower in O than in L (pmax, a left-shifted and less dilated curve and a lower reliance on fat oxidation at high exercise intensities suggest that the difference in the fat oxidation kinetics is likely linked to impaired muscular capacity to oxidize NEFA in O. These results may have important implications for the appropriate exercise intensity prescription in training programs designed to optimize fat oxidation in O.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere88707
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 11 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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