Fatty liver index and mortality

The cremona study in the 15th year of follow-up

Giliola Calori, Guido Lattuada, Francesca Ragogna, Maria Paola Garancini, Paolo Crosignani, Marco Villa, Emanuele Bosi, Giacomo Ruotolo, Lorenzo Piemonti, Gianluca Perseghin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A fatty liver, which is a common feature in insulin-resistant states, can lead to chronic liver disease. It has been hypothesized that a fatty liver can also increase the rates of non-hepatic-related morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether the fatty liver index (FLI), a surrogate marker and a validated algorithm derived from the serum triglyceride level, body mass index, waist circumference, and γ-glutamyltransferase level, was associated with the prognosis in a population study. The 15-year all-cause, hepatic-related, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality rates were obtained through the Regional Health Registry in 2011 for 2074 Caucasian middle-aged individuals in the Cremona study, a population study examining the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Italy. During the 15-year observation period, 495 deaths were registered: 34 were hepatic-related, 221 were CVD-related, 180 were cancer-related, and 60 were attributed to other causes. FLI was independently associated with the hepatic-related deaths (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.05, P <0.0001). Age, sex, FLI, cigarette smoking, and diabetes were independently associated with all-cause mortality. Age, sex, FLI, systolic blood pressure, and fibrinogen were independently associated with CVD mortality; meanwhile, age, sex, FLI, and smoking were independently associated with cancer mortality. FLI correlated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a surrogate marker of insulin resistance (Spearman's ρ = 0.57, P <0.0001), and when HOMA-IR was included in the multivariate analyses, FLI retained its association with hepatic-related mortality but not with all-cause, CVD, and cancer-related mortality. Conclusion: FLI is independently associated with hepatic-related mortality. It is also associated with all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality rates, but these associations appear to be tightly interconnected with the risk conferred by the correlated insulin-resistant state.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-152
Number of pages8
JournalHepatology
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

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Fatty Liver
Mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases
Liver
Insulin Resistance
Neoplasms
Homeostasis
Biomarkers
Smoking
Insulin
Blood Pressure
Waist Circumference
Fibrinogen
Italy
Population
Registries
Liver Diseases
Diabetes Mellitus
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Calori, G., Lattuada, G., Ragogna, F., Garancini, M. P., Crosignani, P., Villa, M., ... Perseghin, G. (2011). Fatty liver index and mortality: The cremona study in the 15th year of follow-up. Hepatology, 54(1), 145-152. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24356

Fatty liver index and mortality : The cremona study in the 15th year of follow-up. / Calori, Giliola; Lattuada, Guido; Ragogna, Francesca; Garancini, Maria Paola; Crosignani, Paolo; Villa, Marco; Bosi, Emanuele; Ruotolo, Giacomo; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Perseghin, Gianluca.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 54, No. 1, 07.2011, p. 145-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Calori, G, Lattuada, G, Ragogna, F, Garancini, MP, Crosignani, P, Villa, M, Bosi, E, Ruotolo, G, Piemonti, L & Perseghin, G 2011, 'Fatty liver index and mortality: The cremona study in the 15th year of follow-up', Hepatology, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 145-152. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24356
Calori G, Lattuada G, Ragogna F, Garancini MP, Crosignani P, Villa M et al. Fatty liver index and mortality: The cremona study in the 15th year of follow-up. Hepatology. 2011 Jul;54(1):145-152. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24356
Calori, Giliola ; Lattuada, Guido ; Ragogna, Francesca ; Garancini, Maria Paola ; Crosignani, Paolo ; Villa, Marco ; Bosi, Emanuele ; Ruotolo, Giacomo ; Piemonti, Lorenzo ; Perseghin, Gianluca. / Fatty liver index and mortality : The cremona study in the 15th year of follow-up. In: Hepatology. 2011 ; Vol. 54, No. 1. pp. 145-152.
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