Fetal loss after chorionic villus sampling in twin pregnancy

T. Elger, R. Akolekar, A. Syngelaki, C. De Paco Matallana, F. S. Molina, M. Gallardo Arozena, P. Chaveeva, N. Persico, V. Accurti, K. O. Kagan, N. Prodan, J. Cruz, K. H. Nicolaides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the chorionic villus sampling (CVS)-related risk of fetal loss in twin pregnancy after adjustment for chorionicity, nuchal translucency thickness (NT), intertwin discordance in crown-rump length (CRL), maternal demographic characteristics and serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and free β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). METHODS: This was a multicenter study from eight fetal medicine units in which the leadership were trained at the Harris Birthright Research Centre for Fetal Medicine in London, UK, and in which the protocols for screening, invasive testing and pregnancy management are similar. Data were obtained prospectively from women with twin pregnancy undergoing routine ultrasound examination at 11-13 weeks' gestation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with backward stepwise elimination was used to examine whether CVS provided a significant independent contribution to the prediction of risk of fetal loss after adjusting for maternal and pregnancy characteristics, including maternal age, racial origin and weight, method of conception, smoking status, parity, chorionicity, intertwin discordance in CRL, fetal NT ≥ 95th percentile and free β-hCG and PAPP-A multiples of the median. Similarly, within the CVS group, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effect of the number of intrauterine needle insertions and size of the needle on the risk of fetal loss. RESULTS: The study population of 8581 twin pregnancies undergoing ultrasound examination at 11-13 weeks' gestation included 316 dichorionic and 129 monochorionic twins that had CVS. First, in twin pregnancies undergoing CVS, compared to those not undergoing CVS, there was a 2-fold increased risk of fetal loss at < 24 weeks' gestation and of loss at any stage in pregnancy. Second, the factors providing a significant independent contribution to the prediction of miscarriage or fetal loss in twin pregnancy were increased maternal weight, black racial origin, monochorionicity, and more so monoamnionicity, large intertwin discordance in CRL and increased fetal NT, and, in the case of fetal loss at any stage, there was also a contribution from assisted conception and low serum PAPP-A. Third, after adjustment for maternal and pregnancy characteristics, CVS did not provide a significant contribution to the risk of fetal loss. Fourth, in twin pregnancies that had CVS, there was no significant contribution to fetal loss from the number of intrauterine needle insertions or needle size. CONCLUSION: The 2-fold increased risk of fetal loss following CVS in twin pregnancy can, to a great extent, be explained by maternal and pregnancy characteristics rather than the invasive procedure itself.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-55
Number of pages8
JournalUltrasound in obstetrics & gynecology : the official journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2021

Keywords

  • first-trimester screening
  • invasive testing
  • miscarriage
  • stillbirth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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