Final height outcome in both untreated and testosterone-treated boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty

Teresa Arrigo, Mariangela Cisternino, Filippo De Luca, Giuseppe Saggese, Maria Francesca Messina, Anna Maria Pasquino, Vincenzo De Sanctis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present retrospective study is based on a historical follow-up of 49 boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP) who went into puberty spontaneously (27 cases) or induced by depotestosterone treatment, 50 mg/ month for 6 months (22 cases). At the time of puberty the two groups of boys were similar in bone age, height deficiency, target height (TH) and had similar predicted final heights (FH). Their FH was measured and compared with TH calculated from measured parents' heights. FH did not significantly differ between the untreated boys and those treated. In the two groups of patients FH was similar and corresponded to both TB. and height predicted at puberty onset. This study confirms that most boys with CDGP spontaneously attain a FH within the target range (24/27 cases). A short-term and low dose course of depotestosterone can be used without adverse effects on FH. The Bayley-Pinneau method can be generally considered accurate for predicting FH in CDGP, although significant discrepancies between FH and predicted height have been recorded in a fair number of both untreated and treated boys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-517
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume9
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Bayley-Pinneau method
  • Constitutional delay of growth and puberty
  • Final stature
  • Height prediction
  • Pubertal height gain
  • Target height
  • Testosterone treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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