Fine-grained analysis of shared neural circuits between perceived and observed pain: Implications for the study of empathy for pain

Elia Valentini, Katharina Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Feeling pain and seeing it in others activates largely overlapping neural substrates. A recent study (Corradi-Dell'Acqua C, Hofstetter C, Vuilleumier P. J Neurosci 31: 17996-18006, 2011) for the first time raises the question of whether shared neural activations specifically code pain-related contents or merely their negative-aversive implication. The authors conclude that mid-insula and mid-cingulate share information specific to the presence of pain, whereas anterior insula shares information about its aversive content. We suggest that, together with valence and arousal, the control of saliency and threat may have an important heuristic potential in the study of empathy for pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1805-1807
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume108
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2012

Keywords

  • Cingulate cortex
  • Insular cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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