First-trimester intrauterine hematoma and outcome of pregnancy

Gianpaolo Maso, Giuseppina D'Ottavio, Francesco De Seta, Andrea Sartore, Monica Piccoli, Giampaolo Mandruzzato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies complicated by first-trimester intrauterine hematoma. METHODS: An analysis was performed on 248 cases. The pregnancy outcome was correlated with hematoma volume, gestational age (weeks), and maternal age (years). RESULTS: One hundred eighty-two cases were eligible for the study. Clinical complications occurred in 38.5% of the cases (adverse outcome group). Spontaneous abortion (14.3%), fetal growth restriction (7.7%), and preterm delivery (6.6%) were the most frequent clinical conditions observed. Considering the hematoma variables in adverse and favorable outcome groups, we found a significant difference only for gestational age at diagnosis. The median gestational age was significantly lower (P <.02) in the adverse outcome group (7.27, I and III quartiles 6.22-8.78) than in the favorable outcome cases (8.62, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.98). Among clinical conditions, the median gestational age was significantly lower (P = .02) in pregnancies complicated by spontaneous abortion (6.60, I and III quartiles 5.95-8.36) than in cases not ending in a miscarriage (8.50, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.91). The overall risk of adverse outcome was 2.4 times higher when the hematoma was diagnosed before 9 weeks (odds ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.20-4.70). In particular, intrauterine hematoma observed before 9 weeks significantly increases the risk of spontaneous abortion (odds ratio 14.79, 95% confidence interval 1.95-112.09) CONCLUSION: Intrauterine hematoma can affect the outcome of pregnancy. The risk of spontaneous abortion is related to gestational age and is significantly increased if diagnosed before 9 weeks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-344
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume105
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

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First Pregnancy Trimester
Pregnancy Outcome
Hematoma
Spontaneous Abortion
Gestational Age
Surrogate Mothers
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Maternal Age
Fetal Development
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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First-trimester intrauterine hematoma and outcome of pregnancy. / Maso, Gianpaolo; D'Ottavio, Giuseppina; De Seta, Francesco; Sartore, Andrea; Piccoli, Monica; Mandruzzato, Giampaolo.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 105, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 339-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maso, Gianpaolo ; D'Ottavio, Giuseppina ; De Seta, Francesco ; Sartore, Andrea ; Piccoli, Monica ; Mandruzzato, Giampaolo. / First-trimester intrauterine hematoma and outcome of pregnancy. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2005 ; Vol. 105, No. 2. pp. 339-344.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies complicated by first-trimester intrauterine hematoma. METHODS: An analysis was performed on 248 cases. The pregnancy outcome was correlated with hematoma volume, gestational age (weeks), and maternal age (years). RESULTS: One hundred eighty-two cases were eligible for the study. Clinical complications occurred in 38.5{\%} of the cases (adverse outcome group). Spontaneous abortion (14.3{\%}), fetal growth restriction (7.7{\%}), and preterm delivery (6.6{\%}) were the most frequent clinical conditions observed. Considering the hematoma variables in adverse and favorable outcome groups, we found a significant difference only for gestational age at diagnosis. The median gestational age was significantly lower (P <.02) in the adverse outcome group (7.27, I and III quartiles 6.22-8.78) than in the favorable outcome cases (8.62, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.98). Among clinical conditions, the median gestational age was significantly lower (P = .02) in pregnancies complicated by spontaneous abortion (6.60, I and III quartiles 5.95-8.36) than in cases not ending in a miscarriage (8.50, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.91). The overall risk of adverse outcome was 2.4 times higher when the hematoma was diagnosed before 9 weeks (odds ratio 2.37, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.20-4.70). In particular, intrauterine hematoma observed before 9 weeks significantly increases the risk of spontaneous abortion (odds ratio 14.79, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.95-112.09) CONCLUSION: Intrauterine hematoma can affect the outcome of pregnancy. The risk of spontaneous abortion is related to gestational age and is significantly increased if diagnosed before 9 weeks.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies complicated by first-trimester intrauterine hematoma. METHODS: An analysis was performed on 248 cases. The pregnancy outcome was correlated with hematoma volume, gestational age (weeks), and maternal age (years). RESULTS: One hundred eighty-two cases were eligible for the study. Clinical complications occurred in 38.5% of the cases (adverse outcome group). Spontaneous abortion (14.3%), fetal growth restriction (7.7%), and preterm delivery (6.6%) were the most frequent clinical conditions observed. Considering the hematoma variables in adverse and favorable outcome groups, we found a significant difference only for gestational age at diagnosis. The median gestational age was significantly lower (P <.02) in the adverse outcome group (7.27, I and III quartiles 6.22-8.78) than in the favorable outcome cases (8.62, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.98). Among clinical conditions, the median gestational age was significantly lower (P = .02) in pregnancies complicated by spontaneous abortion (6.60, I and III quartiles 5.95-8.36) than in cases not ending in a miscarriage (8.50, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.91). The overall risk of adverse outcome was 2.4 times higher when the hematoma was diagnosed before 9 weeks (odds ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.20-4.70). In particular, intrauterine hematoma observed before 9 weeks significantly increases the risk of spontaneous abortion (odds ratio 14.79, 95% confidence interval 1.95-112.09) CONCLUSION: Intrauterine hematoma can affect the outcome of pregnancy. The risk of spontaneous abortion is related to gestational age and is significantly increased if diagnosed before 9 weeks.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies complicated by first-trimester intrauterine hematoma. METHODS: An analysis was performed on 248 cases. The pregnancy outcome was correlated with hematoma volume, gestational age (weeks), and maternal age (years). RESULTS: One hundred eighty-two cases were eligible for the study. Clinical complications occurred in 38.5% of the cases (adverse outcome group). Spontaneous abortion (14.3%), fetal growth restriction (7.7%), and preterm delivery (6.6%) were the most frequent clinical conditions observed. Considering the hematoma variables in adverse and favorable outcome groups, we found a significant difference only for gestational age at diagnosis. The median gestational age was significantly lower (P <.02) in the adverse outcome group (7.27, I and III quartiles 6.22-8.78) than in the favorable outcome cases (8.62, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.98). Among clinical conditions, the median gestational age was significantly lower (P = .02) in pregnancies complicated by spontaneous abortion (6.60, I and III quartiles 5.95-8.36) than in cases not ending in a miscarriage (8.50, I and III quartiles 6.70-9.91). The overall risk of adverse outcome was 2.4 times higher when the hematoma was diagnosed before 9 weeks (odds ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.20-4.70). In particular, intrauterine hematoma observed before 9 weeks significantly increases the risk of spontaneous abortion (odds ratio 14.79, 95% confidence interval 1.95-112.09) CONCLUSION: Intrauterine hematoma can affect the outcome of pregnancy. The risk of spontaneous abortion is related to gestational age and is significantly increased if diagnosed before 9 weeks.

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