Fish consumption and subsequent change in body weight in European women and men

Marianne U. Jakobsen, Claus Dethlefsen, Karen M. Due, Anne M. May, Dora Romaguera, Anne Claire Vergnaud, Teresa Norat, Thorkild I A Sørensen, Jytte Halkjær, Anne Tjønneland, Marie Christine Boutron-Ruault, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Guy Fagherazzi, Birgit Teucher, Tilman Kühn, Manuela M. Bergmann, Heiner Boeing, Androniki Naska, Philippos Orfanos, Antonia TrichopoulouDomenico Palli, Maria Santucci De Magistris, Sabina Sieri, H. B. Bueno-De-Mesquita, Daphne L. Van Der A, Dagrun Engeset, Anette Hjartåker, Laudina Rodríguez, Antonio Agudo, Esther Molina-Montes, José M. Huerta, Aurelio Barricarte, Pilar Amiano, Jonas Manjer, Elisabet Wirfält, Göran Hallmans, Ingegerd Johansson, Kay Tee Khaw, Nicholas J. Wareham, Timothy J. Key, Veronique Chajès, Nadia Slimani, Elio Riboli, Petra H M Peeters, Kim Overvad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Fish consumption is the major dietary source of EPA and DHA, which according to rodent experiments may reduce body fat mass and prevent obesity. Only a few human studies have investigated the association between fish consumption and body-weight gain. We investigated the association between fish consumption and subsequent change in body weight. Women and men (n 344Â 757) participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition were followed for a median of 5·0 years. Linear and logistic regression were used to investigate the associations between fish consumption and subsequent change in body weight. Among women, the annual weight change was 5·70 (95Â % CI 4·35, 7·06), 2·23 (95Â % CI 0·16, 4·31) and 11·12 (95Â % CI 8·17, 14·08)Â g/10Â g higher total, lean and fatty fish consumption per d, respectively. The OR of becoming overweight in 5 years among women who were normal weight at enrolment was 1·02 (95Â % CI 1·01, 1·02), 1·01 (95Â % CI 1·00, 1·02) and 1·02 (95Â % CI 1·01, 1·04)Â g/10Â g higher total, lean and fatty consumption per d, respectively. Among men, fish consumption was not statistically significantly associated with weight change. Adjustment for potential over- or underestimation of fish consumption did not systematically change the observed associations, but the 95Â % CI became wider. The results in subgroups from analyses stratified by age or BMI at enrolment were not systematically different. In conclusion, the present study suggests that fish consumption has no appreciable association with body-weight gain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-362
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 28 2013

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Diets
  • Fish
  • Follow-up studies
  • n-3 PUFA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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