Follow up in women with biopsy diagnosis of cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL): how long should it be?

Andrea Ciavattini, Nicolò Clemente, Dimitrios Tsiroglou, Francesco Sopracordevole, Matteo Serri, Giovanni Delli Carpini, Maria Papiccio, Paolo Cattani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To analyse the regression rate and the risk of persistence or progression of the lesions in women with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Materials and methods: Retrospective cohort study of women with biopsy diagnosis of cervical LSIL, from January 2010 to December 2013. After the initial diagnosis of LSIL, all the women underwent scheduled follow-up examinations with cytology every 6 months for 2 years and an HPV test after 1 year. Results: At the 24 -month follow-up, the regression of cervical LSIL was observed in 88.5% of the women. 10.8% of the women had a persistent lesion, while a progression towards cervical HSIL was reported in 0.7% of the women. The risk of persistence or progression of histological LSIL was higher in women with ASC-H or HSIL on the referral cytology and in tobacco users. Conclusion: In women with biopsy diagnosis of cervical LSIL, preceded by ASCUS or LSIL on cytology, a high rate of regression was observed and, in most of the cases, the regression occurred in the first year of follow-up. In women with cervical LSIL, preceded by ASC-H or HSIL on cytology, and in tobacco users, a higher risk of persistence and progression was observed. Thus, in these cases, repeated follow-up examinations, even with the HR-HPV test, are advisable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)997-1003
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume295
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia
  • CIN1
  • Follow-up
  • LSIL
  • Persistence
  • Regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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