Food groups, oils and butter, and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx

S. Franceschi, A. Favero, E. Conti, R. Talamini, R. Volpe, E. Negri, L. Barzan, C. La Vecchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To elucidate the role of dietary habits, a study was carried out in 1992-1997 in the province of Pordenone in Northeastern Italy, and those of Rome and Latina in central Italy. Cases were 512 men and 86 women with cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx (lip, salivary glands and nasopharynx excluded) and controls were 1008 men and 483 women who had been admitted to local hospitals for a broad range of acute non-neoplastic conditions. The validated dietary section of the questionnaire included 78 foods or recipes and ten questions on fat intake patterns. After allowance for education, smoking, alcohol and total energy intake, significant trends of increasing risk with increasing intake emerged for soups, eggs, processed meats, cakes and desserts, and butter. Risk was approximately halved in the highest compared to the lowest intake quintile for coffee and tea, white bread, poultry, fish, raw and cooked vegetables, citrus fruit, and olive oil. The inverse association with oils, especially olive oil, was only slightly attenuated by allowance for vegetable intake. Thus, frequent consumption of vegetables, citrus fruit, fish and vegetable oils were the major features of a low-risk diet for cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)614-620
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume80
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Pharyngeal Neoplasms
Mouth Neoplasms
Vegetables
Mouth
Citrus
Food
Italy
Butter
Plant Oils
Nasopharynx
Fish Oils
Bread
Coffee
Feeding Behavior
Tea
Poultry
Lip
Energy Intake
Salivary Glands
Hispanic Americans

Keywords

  • Butter
  • Cancer of the oral cavity
  • Cancer of the pharynx
  • Diet
  • Oil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Franceschi, S., Favero, A., Conti, E., Talamini, R., Volpe, R., Negri, E., ... La Vecchia, C. (1999). Food groups, oils and butter, and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. British Journal of Cancer, 80(3-4), 614-620. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6690400

Food groups, oils and butter, and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. / Franceschi, S.; Favero, A.; Conti, E.; Talamini, R.; Volpe, R.; Negri, E.; Barzan, L.; La Vecchia, C.

In: British Journal of Cancer, Vol. 80, No. 3-4, 1999, p. 614-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Franceschi, S, Favero, A, Conti, E, Talamini, R, Volpe, R, Negri, E, Barzan, L & La Vecchia, C 1999, 'Food groups, oils and butter, and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx', British Journal of Cancer, vol. 80, no. 3-4, pp. 614-620. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6690400
Franceschi S, Favero A, Conti E, Talamini R, Volpe R, Negri E et al. Food groups, oils and butter, and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. British Journal of Cancer. 1999;80(3-4):614-620. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6690400
Franceschi, S. ; Favero, A. ; Conti, E. ; Talamini, R. ; Volpe, R. ; Negri, E. ; Barzan, L. ; La Vecchia, C. / Food groups, oils and butter, and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. In: British Journal of Cancer. 1999 ; Vol. 80, No. 3-4. pp. 614-620.
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