Foreign children with cancer in Italy

Roberto Rondelli, Giorgio Dini, Marisa De Rosa, Paola Quarello, Gianni Bisogno, Maurizio Aricò, Carivaldo Vasconcelos, Paolo Tamaro, Gabriella Casazza, Marco Zecca, Clementina De Laurentis, Fulvio Porta, Andrea Pession

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: There has been a noticeable annual increase in the number of children coming to Italy for medical treatment, just like it has happened in the rest of the European Union. In Italy, the assistance to children suffering from cancer is assured by the current network of 54 centres members of the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP), which has kept records of all demographic and clinical data in the database of Mod.1.01 Registry since 1989. Methods. We used the information stored in the already mentioned database to assess the impact of immigration of foreign children with cancer on centres' activity, with the scope of drawing a map of the assistance to these cases. Results: Out of 14,738 cases recorded by all centres in the period from 1999 to 2008, 92.2% were born and resident in Italy, 4.1% (608) were born abroad and living abroad and 3.7% (538) were born abroad and living in Italy. Foreign children cases have increased over the years from 2.5% in 1999 to. 8.1% in 2008. Most immigrant children came from Europe (65.7%), whereas patients who came from America, Asia and Oceania amounted to 13.2%, 10.1%, 0.2%, respectively. The immigrant survival rate was lower compared to that of children who were born in Italy. This is especially true for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients entered an AIEOP protocol, who showed a 10-years survival rate of 71.0% vs. 80.7% (p <0.001) for immigrants and patients born in Italy, respectively. Conclusions: Children and adolescents are an increasingly important part of the immigration phenomenon, which occurs in many parts of the world. In Italy the vast majority of children affected by malignancies are treated in AIEOP centres. Since immigrant children are predominantly treated in northern Italy, these centres have developed a special expertise in treating immigrant patients, which is certainly very useful for the entire AIEOP network.

Original languageEnglish
Article number44
JournalItalian Journal of Pediatrics
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Italy
Neoplasms
Emigration and Immigration
Survival Rate
Oceania
Databases
Hematology
European Union
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Registries
Demography
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Rondelli, R., Dini, G., De Rosa, M., Quarello, P., Bisogno, G., Aricò, M., ... Pession, A. (2011). Foreign children with cancer in Italy. Italian Journal of Pediatrics, 37(1), [44]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-37-44

Foreign children with cancer in Italy. / Rondelli, Roberto; Dini, Giorgio; De Rosa, Marisa; Quarello, Paola; Bisogno, Gianni; Aricò, Maurizio; Vasconcelos, Carivaldo; Tamaro, Paolo; Casazza, Gabriella; Zecca, Marco; De Laurentis, Clementina; Porta, Fulvio; Pession, Andrea.

In: Italian Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 37, No. 1, 44, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rondelli, R, Dini, G, De Rosa, M, Quarello, P, Bisogno, G, Aricò, M, Vasconcelos, C, Tamaro, P, Casazza, G, Zecca, M, De Laurentis, C, Porta, F & Pession, A 2011, 'Foreign children with cancer in Italy', Italian Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 37, no. 1, 44. https://doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-37-44
Rondelli R, Dini G, De Rosa M, Quarello P, Bisogno G, Aricò M et al. Foreign children with cancer in Italy. Italian Journal of Pediatrics. 2011;37(1). 44. https://doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-37-44
Rondelli, Roberto ; Dini, Giorgio ; De Rosa, Marisa ; Quarello, Paola ; Bisogno, Gianni ; Aricò, Maurizio ; Vasconcelos, Carivaldo ; Tamaro, Paolo ; Casazza, Gabriella ; Zecca, Marco ; De Laurentis, Clementina ; Porta, Fulvio ; Pession, Andrea. / Foreign children with cancer in Italy. In: Italian Journal of Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 37, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: There has been a noticeable annual increase in the number of children coming to Italy for medical treatment, just like it has happened in the rest of the European Union. In Italy, the assistance to children suffering from cancer is assured by the current network of 54 centres members of the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP), which has kept records of all demographic and clinical data in the database of Mod.1.01 Registry since 1989. Methods. We used the information stored in the already mentioned database to assess the impact of immigration of foreign children with cancer on centres' activity, with the scope of drawing a map of the assistance to these cases. Results: Out of 14,738 cases recorded by all centres in the period from 1999 to 2008, 92.2{\%} were born and resident in Italy, 4.1{\%} (608) were born abroad and living abroad and 3.7{\%} (538) were born abroad and living in Italy. Foreign children cases have increased over the years from 2.5{\%} in 1999 to. 8.1{\%} in 2008. Most immigrant children came from Europe (65.7{\%}), whereas patients who came from America, Asia and Oceania amounted to 13.2{\%}, 10.1{\%}, 0.2{\%}, respectively. The immigrant survival rate was lower compared to that of children who were born in Italy. This is especially true for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients entered an AIEOP protocol, who showed a 10-years survival rate of 71.0{\%} vs. 80.7{\%} (p <0.001) for immigrants and patients born in Italy, respectively. Conclusions: Children and adolescents are an increasingly important part of the immigration phenomenon, which occurs in many parts of the world. In Italy the vast majority of children affected by malignancies are treated in AIEOP centres. Since immigrant children are predominantly treated in northern Italy, these centres have developed a special expertise in treating immigrant patients, which is certainly very useful for the entire AIEOP network.",
author = "Roberto Rondelli and Giorgio Dini and {De Rosa}, Marisa and Paola Quarello and Gianni Bisogno and Maurizio Aric{\`o} and Carivaldo Vasconcelos and Paolo Tamaro and Gabriella Casazza and Marco Zecca and {De Laurentis}, Clementina and Fulvio Porta and Andrea Pession",
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AU - Rondelli, Roberto

AU - Dini, Giorgio

AU - De Rosa, Marisa

AU - Quarello, Paola

AU - Bisogno, Gianni

AU - Aricò, Maurizio

AU - Vasconcelos, Carivaldo

AU - Tamaro, Paolo

AU - Casazza, Gabriella

AU - Zecca, Marco

AU - De Laurentis, Clementina

AU - Porta, Fulvio

AU - Pession, Andrea

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Background: There has been a noticeable annual increase in the number of children coming to Italy for medical treatment, just like it has happened in the rest of the European Union. In Italy, the assistance to children suffering from cancer is assured by the current network of 54 centres members of the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP), which has kept records of all demographic and clinical data in the database of Mod.1.01 Registry since 1989. Methods. We used the information stored in the already mentioned database to assess the impact of immigration of foreign children with cancer on centres' activity, with the scope of drawing a map of the assistance to these cases. Results: Out of 14,738 cases recorded by all centres in the period from 1999 to 2008, 92.2% were born and resident in Italy, 4.1% (608) were born abroad and living abroad and 3.7% (538) were born abroad and living in Italy. Foreign children cases have increased over the years from 2.5% in 1999 to. 8.1% in 2008. Most immigrant children came from Europe (65.7%), whereas patients who came from America, Asia and Oceania amounted to 13.2%, 10.1%, 0.2%, respectively. The immigrant survival rate was lower compared to that of children who were born in Italy. This is especially true for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients entered an AIEOP protocol, who showed a 10-years survival rate of 71.0% vs. 80.7% (p <0.001) for immigrants and patients born in Italy, respectively. Conclusions: Children and adolescents are an increasingly important part of the immigration phenomenon, which occurs in many parts of the world. In Italy the vast majority of children affected by malignancies are treated in AIEOP centres. Since immigrant children are predominantly treated in northern Italy, these centres have developed a special expertise in treating immigrant patients, which is certainly very useful for the entire AIEOP network.

AB - Background: There has been a noticeable annual increase in the number of children coming to Italy for medical treatment, just like it has happened in the rest of the European Union. In Italy, the assistance to children suffering from cancer is assured by the current network of 54 centres members of the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP), which has kept records of all demographic and clinical data in the database of Mod.1.01 Registry since 1989. Methods. We used the information stored in the already mentioned database to assess the impact of immigration of foreign children with cancer on centres' activity, with the scope of drawing a map of the assistance to these cases. Results: Out of 14,738 cases recorded by all centres in the period from 1999 to 2008, 92.2% were born and resident in Italy, 4.1% (608) were born abroad and living abroad and 3.7% (538) were born abroad and living in Italy. Foreign children cases have increased over the years from 2.5% in 1999 to. 8.1% in 2008. Most immigrant children came from Europe (65.7%), whereas patients who came from America, Asia and Oceania amounted to 13.2%, 10.1%, 0.2%, respectively. The immigrant survival rate was lower compared to that of children who were born in Italy. This is especially true for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients entered an AIEOP protocol, who showed a 10-years survival rate of 71.0% vs. 80.7% (p <0.001) for immigrants and patients born in Italy, respectively. Conclusions: Children and adolescents are an increasingly important part of the immigration phenomenon, which occurs in many parts of the world. In Italy the vast majority of children affected by malignancies are treated in AIEOP centres. Since immigrant children are predominantly treated in northern Italy, these centres have developed a special expertise in treating immigrant patients, which is certainly very useful for the entire AIEOP network.

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