Forms of hemiplegia

Giovanni Cioni, Giuseppina Sgandurra, Simonetta Muzzini, Paola B. Paolicelli, Adriano Ferrari

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Traditionally, hemiplegia or hemiparesis, is defined as a central unilateral palsy that only affects one side of the body, almost always of spastic type (Aicardi and Bax 2009), while the word hemidystonia is more adequately used to define the dyskinesic form. With respect to cerebral palsy (CP), a distinction is made between a congenital form of hemiplegia, when the lesion occurs before the end of the neonatal period (within the first four weeks of life), and an acquired form, when the lesion provoking hemiplegia occurs later, within the first three years of life. According to the main case studies published (Hagberg and Hagberg, 2000), congenital forms amount to 70-90% of childhood hemiplegia, while acquired forms only amount to 10-30%. In a recent review conducted by the SCPE (Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe) working group, the prevalence of unilateral spastic hemiplegia accounted for about 0.6 per 1000 live births and it did not change significantly over time (Krägeloh-Mann, 2009). Hemiplegic forms are the most common expression of CP (more than 38% of cases) and the second in terms of frequency, after diplegia, in premature infants (around 20% of cases) (Hagberg et al. 1996; Himmelmann et al. 2005).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions
PublisherSpringer Milan
Pages331-356
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9788847014770
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Hemiplegia
Cerebral Palsy
Muscle Spasticity
Live Birth
Paresis
Premature Infants
Paralysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cioni, G., Sgandurra, G., Muzzini, S., Paolicelli, P. B., & Ferrari, A. (2010). Forms of hemiplegia. In The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions (pp. 331-356). Springer Milan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-88-470-1478-7_16

Forms of hemiplegia. / Cioni, Giovanni; Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Muzzini, Simonetta; Paolicelli, Paola B.; Ferrari, Adriano.

The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions. Springer Milan, 2010. p. 331-356.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cioni, G, Sgandurra, G, Muzzini, S, Paolicelli, PB & Ferrari, A 2010, Forms of hemiplegia. in The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions. Springer Milan, pp. 331-356. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-88-470-1478-7_16
Cioni G, Sgandurra G, Muzzini S, Paolicelli PB, Ferrari A. Forms of hemiplegia. In The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions. Springer Milan. 2010. p. 331-356 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-88-470-1478-7_16
Cioni, Giovanni ; Sgandurra, Giuseppina ; Muzzini, Simonetta ; Paolicelli, Paola B. ; Ferrari, Adriano. / Forms of hemiplegia. The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions. Springer Milan, 2010. pp. 331-356
@inbook{6caa835646094131bff3aa11a1a97c29,
title = "Forms of hemiplegia",
abstract = "Traditionally, hemiplegia or hemiparesis, is defined as a central unilateral palsy that only affects one side of the body, almost always of spastic type (Aicardi and Bax 2009), while the word hemidystonia is more adequately used to define the dyskinesic form. With respect to cerebral palsy (CP), a distinction is made between a congenital form of hemiplegia, when the lesion occurs before the end of the neonatal period (within the first four weeks of life), and an acquired form, when the lesion provoking hemiplegia occurs later, within the first three years of life. According to the main case studies published (Hagberg and Hagberg, 2000), congenital forms amount to 70-90{\%} of childhood hemiplegia, while acquired forms only amount to 10-30{\%}. In a recent review conducted by the SCPE (Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe) working group, the prevalence of unilateral spastic hemiplegia accounted for about 0.6 per 1000 live births and it did not change significantly over time (Kr{\"a}geloh-Mann, 2009). Hemiplegic forms are the most common expression of CP (more than 38{\%} of cases) and the second in terms of frequency, after diplegia, in premature infants (around 20{\%} of cases) (Hagberg et al. 1996; Himmelmann et al. 2005).",
author = "Giovanni Cioni and Giuseppina Sgandurra and Simonetta Muzzini and Paolicelli, {Paola B.} and Adriano Ferrari",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1007/978-88-470-1478-7_16",
language = "English",
isbn = "9788847014770",
pages = "331--356",
booktitle = "The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions",
publisher = "Springer Milan",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Forms of hemiplegia

AU - Cioni, Giovanni

AU - Sgandurra, Giuseppina

AU - Muzzini, Simonetta

AU - Paolicelli, Paola B.

AU - Ferrari, Adriano

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Traditionally, hemiplegia or hemiparesis, is defined as a central unilateral palsy that only affects one side of the body, almost always of spastic type (Aicardi and Bax 2009), while the word hemidystonia is more adequately used to define the dyskinesic form. With respect to cerebral palsy (CP), a distinction is made between a congenital form of hemiplegia, when the lesion occurs before the end of the neonatal period (within the first four weeks of life), and an acquired form, when the lesion provoking hemiplegia occurs later, within the first three years of life. According to the main case studies published (Hagberg and Hagberg, 2000), congenital forms amount to 70-90% of childhood hemiplegia, while acquired forms only amount to 10-30%. In a recent review conducted by the SCPE (Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe) working group, the prevalence of unilateral spastic hemiplegia accounted for about 0.6 per 1000 live births and it did not change significantly over time (Krägeloh-Mann, 2009). Hemiplegic forms are the most common expression of CP (more than 38% of cases) and the second in terms of frequency, after diplegia, in premature infants (around 20% of cases) (Hagberg et al. 1996; Himmelmann et al. 2005).

AB - Traditionally, hemiplegia or hemiparesis, is defined as a central unilateral palsy that only affects one side of the body, almost always of spastic type (Aicardi and Bax 2009), while the word hemidystonia is more adequately used to define the dyskinesic form. With respect to cerebral palsy (CP), a distinction is made between a congenital form of hemiplegia, when the lesion occurs before the end of the neonatal period (within the first four weeks of life), and an acquired form, when the lesion provoking hemiplegia occurs later, within the first three years of life. According to the main case studies published (Hagberg and Hagberg, 2000), congenital forms amount to 70-90% of childhood hemiplegia, while acquired forms only amount to 10-30%. In a recent review conducted by the SCPE (Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe) working group, the prevalence of unilateral spastic hemiplegia accounted for about 0.6 per 1000 live births and it did not change significantly over time (Krägeloh-Mann, 2009). Hemiplegic forms are the most common expression of CP (more than 38% of cases) and the second in terms of frequency, after diplegia, in premature infants (around 20% of cases) (Hagberg et al. 1996; Himmelmann et al. 2005).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889991031&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889991031&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-88-470-1478-7_16

DO - 10.1007/978-88-470-1478-7_16

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84889991031

SN - 9788847014770

SP - 331

EP - 356

BT - The Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: A Guide to the Assessment of Adaptive Functions

PB - Springer Milan

ER -