“Free butterflies will come out of these deep wounds”: A grounded theory of how endometriosis affects women’s psychological health

Federica Facchin, Emanuela Saita, Giussy Barbara, Dhouha Dridi, Paolo Vercellini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to develop a grounded theory of how endometriosis affects psychological health. Open interviews were conducted with 74 patients. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was administered to all women, who were divided into distressed versus non-distressed. At the core of our grounded theory was the notion of disruption due to the common features of living with endometriosis. Experiencing disruption (vs restoring continuity) involved higher distress and was associated with a long pathway to diagnosis, bad doctor–patient relationships, poor physical health, lack of support, negative sense of female identity, and identification of life with endometriosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)538-549
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Butterflies
Personal Autonomy
Women's Health
Endometriosis
Psychology
Wounds and Injuries
Health
Anxiety
Interviews
Depression
Grounded Theory

Keywords

  • disruption
  • endometriosis
  • grounded theory
  • psychological distress
  • psychological health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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