Frequency-dependent baroreflex control of blood pressure and heart rate during physical exercise

Giammario Spadacini, Claudio Passino, Stefano Leuzzi, Felice Valle, Massimo Piepoli, Alessandro Calciati, Peter Sleight, Luciano Bernardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It is widely recognised that during exercise vagal heart rate control is markedly impaired but blood pressure control may or may not be retained. We hypothesised that this uncertainty arose from the differing responses of the vagus (fast) and sympathetic (slow) arms of the autonomic effectors, and to differing sympatho-vagal balance at different exercise intensities. Methods and Results: We studied 12 normals at rest, during moderate (50% maximal heart rate) and submaximal (80% maximal heart rate) exercise. The carotid baroreceptors were stimulated by sinusoidal neck suction at the frequency of the spontaneous high- (during moderate exercise) and low-frequency (during submaximal) fluctuations in heart period and blood pressure. The increases in these oscillations induced by neck suction were measured by autoregressive spectral analysis. At rest neck stimulation increased variability at low frequency (RR: from 6.99 ± 0.24 to 8.87 ± 0.18 ln-ms 2; systolic pressure: from 3.05 ± 1.7 to 4.09 ± 0.17 ln-mm Hg2) and high frequency (RR: from 4.67 ± 0.25 to 6.79 ± 0.31 ln-ms2; systolic pressure: from 1.93 ± 0.2 to 2.67 ± 0.125 ln-mm Hg2) (all p <0.001). During submaximal exercise RR variability decreased but systolic pressure variability rose (p <0.01 vs rest); during submaximal exercise low-frequency neck stimulation increased the low-frequency fluctuations in blood pressure (2.35 ± 0.51 to 4.25 ± 0.38 ln-mm Hg2, p <0.05) and RR. Conversely, neck suction at high frequency was ineffective on systolic pressure, and had only minor effects on RR interval during moderate exercise. Conclusion: During exercise baroreflex control is active on blood pressure, but the efferent response on blood pressure and heart rate is only detected during low frequency stimulation, indicating a frequency-dependent effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-179
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume107
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2006

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Baroreflex
Heart Rate
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Neck
Suction
Pressoreceptors
Uncertainty
Arm

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Baroreceptors
  • Blood pressure
  • Exercise
  • Heart rate variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Spadacini, G., Passino, C., Leuzzi, S., Valle, F., Piepoli, M., Calciati, A., ... Bernardi, L. (2006). Frequency-dependent baroreflex control of blood pressure and heart rate during physical exercise. International Journal of Cardiology, 107(2), 171-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2005.03.011

Frequency-dependent baroreflex control of blood pressure and heart rate during physical exercise. / Spadacini, Giammario; Passino, Claudio; Leuzzi, Stefano; Valle, Felice; Piepoli, Massimo; Calciati, Alessandro; Sleight, Peter; Bernardi, Luciano.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 107, No. 2, 15.02.2006, p. 171-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spadacini, G, Passino, C, Leuzzi, S, Valle, F, Piepoli, M, Calciati, A, Sleight, P & Bernardi, L 2006, 'Frequency-dependent baroreflex control of blood pressure and heart rate during physical exercise', International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 107, no. 2, pp. 171-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2005.03.011
Spadacini, Giammario ; Passino, Claudio ; Leuzzi, Stefano ; Valle, Felice ; Piepoli, Massimo ; Calciati, Alessandro ; Sleight, Peter ; Bernardi, Luciano. / Frequency-dependent baroreflex control of blood pressure and heart rate during physical exercise. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2006 ; Vol. 107, No. 2. pp. 171-179.
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