Fruit and vegetable consumption and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

Alina Vrieling, Bas A J Verhage, Fränzel J B Van Duijnhoven, Mazda Jenab, Kim Overvad, Anne Tjønneland, Anja Olsen, Françoise Clavel-Chapelon, Marie Christine Boutron-Ruault, Rudolf Kaaks, Sabine Rohrmann, Heiner Boeing, Ute Nöthlings, Antonia Trichopoulou, Tountas John, Zilis Dimosthenes, Domenico Palli, Sabina Sieri, Amalia Mattiello, Rosario TuminoPaolo Vineis, Carla H. Van Gils, Petra H M Peeters, Dagrun Engeset, Eiliv Lund, Laudina Rodríguez Suárez, Paula Jakszyn, Nerea Larrañaga, María José Sánchez, María Dolores Chirlaque, Eva Ardanaz, Jonas Manjer, Björn Lindkvist, Göran Hallmans, Weimin Ye, Sheila Bingham, Kay Tee Khaw, Andrew Roddam, Tim Key, Paolo Boffetta, Eric J. Duell, Dominique S. Michaud, Elio Riboli, H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many case-control studies have suggested that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas cohort studies do not support such an association. We examined the associations of the consumption of fruits and vegetables and their main subgroups with pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is comprised of over 520,000 subjects recruited from 10 European countries. The present study included 555 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases after an average follow-up of 8.9 years. Estimates of risk were obtained by Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age at recruitment, gender, and study center, and adjusted for total energy intake, weight, height, history of diabetes mellitus, and smoking status. Total consumption of fruit and vegetables, combined or separately, as well as subgroups of vegetables and fruits were unrelated to risk of pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios (95% CI) for the highest versus the lowest quartile were 0.92 (0.68-1.25) for total fruit and vegetables combined, 0.99 (0.73-1.33) for total vegetables, and 1.02 (0.77-1.36) for total fruits. Stratification by gender or smoking status, restriction to microscopically verified cases, and exclusion of the first 2 years of follow-up did not materially change the results. These results from a large European prospective cohort suggest that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is not associated with decreased risk of pancreatic cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1926-1934
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume124
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 15 2009

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • EPIC
  • Fruit
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Vrieling, A., Verhage, B. A. J., Van Duijnhoven, F. J. B., Jenab, M., Overvad, K., Tjønneland, A., Olsen, A., Clavel-Chapelon, F., Boutron-Ruault, M. C., Kaaks, R., Rohrmann, S., Boeing, H., Nöthlings, U., Trichopoulou, A., John, T., Dimosthenes, Z., Palli, D., Sieri, S., Mattiello, A., ... Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. (2009). Fruit and vegetable consumption and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 124(8), 1926-1934. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24134